Appendix: Wasp, Extra, 27 July 1842

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [2]
image
anger of the Lord returned not until he had done, nor until he had performed the intents of his heart.]-
,
General in Israel.Times and Seasons, 1 Feb. 1842, 2:681–682.
abolition principles, were quite warm, as the Times and Seasons of March 15, 1842, will show by reading the correspondence between himself and Charles V. Dyer, M. D., of .
From the Times and Seasons, March 15, 1842.
“Let the friends of freedom arise and utter their voice, like the voice of ten thousand thunders—let them take every constitutional means to procure a redress of grievances—let there be a concerted effort, and the victory is ours. Let the broad banners of freedom be unfurled, and soon the prison doors will be opened, the captive set at liberty, and the oppressed go free. will then remember the unoffending Mormons in the days of their captivity and bondage—when murder and rapine were her darling attributes—why, my heart is filled with indignation, and my blood boils within me, when I contemplate the vast injustice and cruelty which has meted out to that great philanthropist and devout Christian, General Joseph Smith, and his honest and faithful adherents—the Latter Day Saints, or Mormons:”
“Now let us make a strong, concerted, and vigorous effort, for universal liberty, to every soul of mancivil, religious, and political. With high considerations of respect, and esteem, suffer me to subscribe myself—
Yours Respectfully,
.
Charles V. Dyer, M. D.”
It will be seen by this that Gen. Smith was a great philanthropist as long as could practice adultery, fornication, and—we were going to say, (Buggery,) without being exposed. But if the Missourians are willing to harbor an abolitionist as a spy, and let him practice the real amalgamation among the negresses of their State,—huzza for the ; ‘there by hangs a tale’
But we must hold up, for truly we have never witnessed so mortal a case of black vomit: If ; if , if the world can swallow such gall and wormwood, from the mouth of , and not feel qualmish while gag[g]ing it down, then verily the Physician can heal himself.
Such egotism; who made ? who granted the Charter? who made the ? who made Smith Lieutenant General, for a play thing? who commanded to approve all these mighty acts? [image]
, with “all my laurels thick upon me.!” But alas! the third day came a chilling frost and nipt them, and of all my great titles, honors and consequence, although I veto the practice of being tried by court martial save such an one as I shall dictate, I have found that greatness has its inconveniences, and there is nothing left but me!
To conclude, if the does not find the way of the transgressor hard, then honor has fled, but tell it not in , publish it not in , lest the uncircumsised Philistines should strew his ashes to the four winds, that there may not be left a trace of so vile a wretch.
——
At a meeting of the citizens of the city of held in said city at the meeting ground, July 22d 1842.
Esq. was called to the chair and was appointed clerk.
The meeting was called to order by the who stated the object of the meeting to be to obtain an expression of the public mind in reference to the reports gone abroad, calumniating the character of Joesph Smith. Gen. then rose and presented the following resolution.
Resolved—That, having heard that was circulating many base falsehoods respecting a number of the citizens of , and especially against our worthy and respected Mayor, Joseph Smith, we do hereby manifest to the world that so far as we are acquainted with Joseph Smith we know him to be a good, moral, virtuous, peacable and patriotic man, and a firm supporter of law, justice and equal right; that he at all times upholds and keeps inviolate the constitution of this and of the .
A vote was then called and the resolution adopted by a large concourse of citizens, numbering somewhere about a thousand men. Two or three, voted in the negative.
then rose and spoke at some length in explanation of his negative vote. Pres. Joseph Smith spoke in reply—
Question to , ‘Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way!’ Answer, by Elder , ‘Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.’
Elder responeed [responded] at some length. Elder then spoke in reply, and was followed by Elders and Pres. . Several others spoke bearing testimony of the iniquity of those who had calumniated Pres. J. Smith’s character.
Meeting adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Meeting assembled pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the .
A petition was then received from a committee appointed by the city council for the reception, approbation, and signatures of the citizens generally, petitioning the of for protection in our peacable rights, which was read approved, and signed by, 8,00 persons.
ESQ., Chairman.
, Clerk.
Note. In the Wasp of Saturday last, a mistake occurred in the minutes of the public meeting held in this , in inadvertently omitting some qualifying words in the question of Pres. Joseph Smith to Elder , and in his reply. The omission was without design and the proper corrections are made in the Extra.
. Clerk.
————
MORE DISCLOSURES.
It is not with a view to excite the passions and prejudices of the people, that the following affidavits, are made public, but to disabuse the community, which can not be less than fomented at the perusal of letters and affidavits which have recently shot forth like meteors. Our space is too small to publish the documents referred to, but as there are no lack of presses and men, to give the a fair hearing, as well as extensive circulation, we shall presume that every body knows his story about the Mormons at , and proceed to rebut, refute, disprove, or expose, as the nature of the case may require.
The claims among all his et ceteras a little law, but had he reflected once on lex scripta, where he has ten times to gratify his lustful desires, he would exclaim like the old barrister, “John might swallow a cart load of such stuff without obtaining one particle of truth.” His affidavits are mere wind for effect. knows better than to make such foolish quirks. In fact, until the whole City Council of are impeached, the Doctor must stand before the public as a perjured man.— There let him stand.
Two things are certainly requisite in witnesses,—knowledge and character: By this rule, as the fails himself, we think some of his testimony, when properly cross examined will appear a little more than plumb. Who is Mrs. Shindle? A harlot. What next? References to others, whose knowledge of facts and weight of character, will find a brief—ex necessitati rei.
The ’s duress, so gravely sworn to, is the climax of his legal sagacity. There is a point at issue in that, which, when the Doctor wakes from his lethargy, will look like a vexed question, with iron eyes, which may refresh his mind with the consolation that sudden and violent moves in public, often bring leisure, repentance in solitude.
As it regards his third letter, cencerning fraud, time alone will determine that. Common law, common sense, and common prudence, teach us to try men for crimes that they have committed, not for what they may, commit.
What he says of the proceedings of the Lodge is nothing; he is an expelled mason. name goes with his certificate, and settles the matter on that point, and with his . ’ name is to the city council’s affidavit; and we might add many other things to show the vanity of the man and the enormity of his crimes, but we forbear, though a word or two more may not be amiss. As to the band, which seems like Hamlet’s ghost to haunt the by night and by day, it must be something more than Mormon, for the City Council testifies that they know of no such band. And in justice to the community we ought to say, and strangers who are among us daily bear [illegible] same evidence, that nothing of any such league, combination or knot of men, is known in .
The certificates of , , and , and Miss Pamela M. Michael, (the Journal’s Mitchell) go to show that used the names of persons without their, consent. These certificates speak for themselves, and leave the doctor before the public as he is, a debaucher, a spoiler of character and virtue, and a living pestilence, walking in darkness to fester in his own infamy.
There is one affidavit out, that might easily be put out of the way; and in justice to the community, and the aggravation of the crimes which he has committed, (and to substantiate which, the testimony of respectable persons has been properly authenticated, but which is actually too indelicate for publicity,) we say, and every man who has a wife, or a daughter, or a sister, that he wishes uncontaminated with vice of the slyest but most atrocious mien, will say, we will never rest till the law is executed on such a bloody lifed Vampyre.
——
AFFIDAVIT OF THE CITY COUNCIL.
We the undersigned, members of the city council of the City of , testify that was not under duress at the time that he testified before the city council May 19th 1842 concerning Joseph Smith’s innocence, virtue, and pure teaching—his statements that he has lately made concerning this matter are false,—there was no excitement at the time, nor was he in anywise threatened [m]enaced or intimidated, his appearance at the city council was voluntary, he asked the privilege of speaking, which was granted, after speaking for some time on the city affairs, Joseph Smith asked him if he knew any thing bad concerning his public or private character, he then delivered those statements contained in the testimony voluntarilly, and of his own free will, and went of his own accord as free as any member of the council.
We do further testify that there is no such thing as a Society in this nor any combination, other than the Masonic Lodge, of which we have any knowledge.
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
,
Subscibed, and sworn to, by the persons whose names appear to the foregoing affidavit, this 20th day of July, A. D. 1842; except , who subscribed and affirmed to the foregoing this day, before me
,
Justice of the Peace, within and for , Illinois.
Esq., is an old resident in this place, and is not a Mormon.
 
AFFIDAVIT OF .
On the seventeenth day of may, 1842, having been made acquainted with some of the conduct of , which was given in testimony under oath before Alderman , by several females, who testified that endeavored to seduce them and accomplished his designs by saying it was right; that it was one of the mysteries of God, which was to be revealed when the people was strongenough in the faith to bear such mysteries—that it was perfectly right to have illicit intercourse with females, providing no one knew it but themselves, vehemently trying them from day to day, to yield to his passions, bringing witnesses of his own clan to testify that their was such revelations and such commandments, and that it was of God; also stating that he would be responsible for their sins, if their was any; and that he would give them medicine to produce abortions, providing they should become pregnant. One of these witnesses, a married woman that he attended upon in his professional capacity, whilst she was sick, stated that he made proposals to her of a similar nature; he told her that he wished her husband was dead, and that if he was dead he would marry her and clear out out with her; he also begged her permission to give him medicine to that effect; he did try to give him medicine, but he would not take it—on interogating her what she thought of such teaching, she replied, she was sick at the time, and had to be lifted in and out of her bed like a child. Many other acts as criminal were reported to me at the time. On becoming acquainted with these facts, I was determined to prosecute him, and bring him to justice.— Some person knowing my determintion, having informed him of it, he sent to me and , to request an interview with me and to see if their could not be a reconciliation made. I told them I thought there could not be, his crimes were so henious; but told them I was willing to see him; he immediately came to see me; he begged on me to forgive him, this once, and not prosecute him and expose him, he said he was guilty, and did acknowledge the crimes that were alleged against him; he seemed to be sorry that he had commited such acts, and wept much, and desired that it might not be made public, for it would ruin him forever; he wished me to wait; but I was determined to bring him to justice, and declined listening to his entreaties; he then wished me to wait until he could have an interview with the masonic fraternity; he also wanted an interview with Br. Joseph; he wished to know of me, if I would forgive him, and desist from my intentions, if he could obtain their forgiveness; and requested the privilege of an interview immediately. I granted him that privilege as I was acting as master pro. tem. at that time; he also wished an interview first with Br. Joseph; at that time Brother Joseph was crossing the yard from the house to the store, he immediately come to the store and met on the way; he reached out his hand to Br. Joseph and said, will you forgive me, weeping at the time; he said Br. Joseph, I am guilty, I acknowledge it, and I beg of you not to expose me, for it will ruin me; Joseph replied, ! why are you using my name to car[r]y on your helish wickedness? Have I ever taught you that fornication and adultery was right, or poligamy or any such practices? He said you never did. Did I ever teach you any thing that was not virtuous—that was iniquitous, either in public or private? He said you never did. Did you ever know anything unvirtuous or unrighteous in my conduct or actions at any time, either in public or in private? he said, I did not; are you willing to make oath to this before an Alderman of the ? he said I am willing to do so. Joseph said go into my , and write what you can in conscience subscribe your name to, and I will be satisfied—I will, he said, and went into the office, and I went with him and he requested pen ink and paper of , who was acting clerk in that office, and was also secetary pro. tem. for the Nauvoo Lodge U. D. gave him paper, pen and ink, and he stood at the desk and wrote the following article which was published in the 11th No. of the Wasp; sworn to and subscribed before , Alderman, 17th day of May, A. D. 1842; he called in Br. Joseph, and read it to him and asked him if that would do, he said it would, he then swore to it as before mentioned; the article was as follows:
State of Illinois,)
City of .)
Personably appeared before me, , an Alderman of said city of , , who being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith: that he never was taught any thing in the least cantrary to the strictest principles [p. [2]]
anger of the Lord returned not until he had done, nor until he had performed the intents of his heart.]-
,
General in Israel.Times and Seasons, 1 Feb. 1842, 2:681–682.
abolition principles, were quite warm, as the Times and Seasons of March 15, 1842, will show by reading the correspondence between himself and Charles V. Dyer, M. D., of .
From the Times and Seasons, March 15, 1842.
“Let the friends of freedom arise and utter their voice, like the voice of ten thousand thunders—let them take every constitutional means to procure a redress of grievances—let there be a concerted effort, and the victory is ours. Let the broad banners of freedom be unfurled, and soon the prison doors will be opened, the captive set at liberty, and the oppressed go free. will then remember the unoffending Mormons in the days of their captivity and bondage—when murder and rapine were her darling attributes—why, my heart is filled with indignation, and my blood boils within me, when I contemplate the vast injustice and cruelty which has meted out to that great philanthropist and devout Christian, General Joseph Smith, and his honest and faithful adherents—the Latter Day Saints, or Mormons:”
“Now let us make a strong, concerted, and vigorous effort, for universal liberty, to every soul of mancivil, religious, and political. With high considerations of respect, and esteem, suffer me to subscribe myself—
Yours Respectfully,
.
Charles V. Dyer, M. D.”
It will be seen by this that Gen. Smith was a great philanthropist as long as could practice adultery, fornication, and—we were going to say, (Buggery,) without being exposed. But if the Missourians are willing to harbor an abolitionist as a spy, and let him practice the real amalgamation among the negresses of their State,—huzza for the ; ‘there by hangs a tale’
But we must hold up, for truly we have never witnessed so mortal a case of black vomit: If ; if , if the world can swallow such gall and wormwood, from the mouth of , and not feel qualmish while gagging it down, then verily the Physician can heal himself.
Such egotism; who made ? who granted the Charter? who made the ? who made Smith Lieutenant General, for a play thing? who commanded to approve all these mighty acts? [image]
, with “all my laurels thick upon me.!” But alas! the third day came a chilling frost and nipt them, and of all my great titles, honors and consequence, although I veto the practice of being tried by court martial save such an one as I shall dictate, I have found that greatness has its inconveniences, and there is nothing left but me!
To conclude, if the does not find the way of the transgressor hard, then honor has fled, but tell it not in , publish it not in , lest the uncircumsised Philistines should strew his ashes to the four winds, that there may not be left a trace of so vile a wretch.
——
At a meeting of the citizens of the city of held in said city at the meeting ground, July 22d 1842.
Esq. was called to the chair and was appointed clerk.
The meeting was called to order by the who stated the object of the meeting to be to obtain an expression of the public mind in reference to the reports gone abroad, calumniating the character of Joesph Smith. Gen. then rose and presented the following resolution.
Resolved—That, having heard that was circulating many base falsehoods respecting a number of the citizens of , and especially against our worthy and respected Mayor, Joseph Smith, we do hereby manifest to the world that so far as we are acquainted with Joseph Smith we know him to be a good, moral, virtuous, peacable and patriotic man, and a firm supporter of law, justice and equal right; that he at all times upholds and keeps inviolate the constitution of this and of the .
A vote was then called and the resolution adopted by a large concourse of citizens, numbering somewhere about a thousand men. Two or three, voted in the negative.
then rose and spoke at some length in explanation of his negative vote. Pres. Joseph Smith spoke in reply—
Question to , ‘Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way!’ Answer, by Elder , ‘Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.’
Elder responeed responded at some length. Elder then spoke in reply, and was followed by Elders and Pres. . Several others spoke bearing testimony of the iniquity of those who had calumniated Pres. J. Smith’s character.
Meeting adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Meeting assembled pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the .
A petition was then received from a committee appointed by the city council for the reception, approbation, and signatures of the citizens generally, petitioning the of for protection in our peacable rights, which was read approved, and signed by, 8,00 persons.
ESQ., Chairman.
, Clerk.
Note. In the Wasp of Saturday last, a mistake occurred in the minutes of the public meeting held in this , in inadvertently omitting some qualifying words in the question of Pres. Joseph Smith to Elder , and in his reply. The omission was without design and the proper corrections are made in the Extra.
. Clerk.
————
MORE DISCLOSURES.
It is not with a view to excite the passions and prejudices of the people, that the following affidavits, are made public, but to disabuse the community, which can not be less than fomented at the perusal of letters and affidavits which have recently shot forth like meteors. Our space is too small to publish the documents referred to, but as there are no lack of presses and men, to give the a fair hearing, as well as extensive circulation, we shall presume that every body knows his story about the Mormons at , and proceed to rebut, refute, disprove, or expose, as the nature of the case may require.
The claims among all his et ceteras a little law, but had he reflected once on lex scripta, where he has ten times to gratify his lustful desires, he would exclaim like the old barrister, “John might swallow a cart load of such stuff without obtaining one particle of truth.” His affidavits are mere wind for effect. knows better than to make such foolish quirks. In fact, until the whole City Council of are impeached, the Doctor must stand before the public as a perjured man.— There let him stand.
Two things are certainly requisite in witnesses,—knowledge and character: By this rule, as the fails himself, we think some of his testimony, when properly cross examined will appear a little more than plumb. Who is Mrs. Shindle? A harlot. What next? References to others, whose knowledge of facts and weight of character, will find a brief—ex necessitati rei.
The ’s duress, so gravely sworn to, is the climax of his legal sagacity. There is a point at issue in that, which, when the Doctor wakes from his lethargy, will look like a vexed question, with iron eyes, which may refresh his mind with the consolation that sudden and violent moves in public, often bring leisure, repentance in solitude.
As it regards his third letter, cencerning fraud, time alone will determine that. Common law, common sense, and common prudence, teach us to try men for crimes that they have committed, not for what they may, commit.
What he says of the proceedings of the Lodge is nothing; he is an expelled mason. name goes with his certificate, and settles the matter on that point, and with his . ’ name is to the city council’s affidavit; and we might add many other things to show the vanity of the man and the enormity of his crimes, but we forbear, though a word or two more may not be amiss. As to the band, which seems like Hamlet’s ghost to haunt the by night and by day, it must be something more than Mormon, for the City Council testifies that they know of no such band. And in justice to the community we ought to say, and strangers who are among us daily bear same evidence, that nothing of any such league, combination or knot of men, is known in .
The certificates of , , and , and Miss Pamela M. Michael, (the Journal’s Mitchell) go to show that used the names of persons without their, consent. These certificates speak for themselves, and leave the doctor before the public as he is, a debaucher, a spoiler of character and virtue, and a living pestilence, walking in darkness to fester in his own infamy.
There is one affidavit out, that might easily be put out of the way; and in justice to the community, and the aggravation of the crimes which he has committed, (and to substantiate which, the testimony of respectable persons has been properly authenticated, but which is actually too indelicate for publicity,) we say, and every man who has a wife, or a daughter, or a sister, that he wishes uncontaminated with vice of the slyest but most atrocious mien, will say, we will never rest till the law is executed on such a bloody lifed Vampyre.
——
AFFIDAVIT OF THE CITY COUNCIL.
We the undersigned, members of the city council of the City of , testify that was not under duress at the time that he testified before the city council May 19th 1842 concerning Joseph Smith’s innocence, virtue, and pure teaching—his statements that he has lately made concerning this matter are false,—there was no excitement at the time, nor was he in anywise threatened menaced or intimidated, his appearance at the city council was voluntary, he asked the privilege of speaking, which was granted, after speaking for some time on the city affairs, Joseph Smith asked him if he knew any thing bad concerning his public or private character, he then delivered those statements contained in the testimony voluntarilly, and of his own free will, and went of his own accord as free as any member of the council.
We do further testify that there is no such thing as a Society in this nor any combination, other than the Masonic Lodge, of which we have any knowledge.
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
,
Subscibed, and sworn to, by the persons whose names appear to the foregoing affidavit, this 20th day of July, A. D. 1842; except , who subscribed and affirmed to the foregoing this day, before me
,
Justice of the Peace, within and for , Illinois.
Esq., is an old resident in this place, and is not a Mormon.
 
AFFIDAVIT OF .
On the seventeenth day of may, 1842, having been made acquainted with some of the conduct of , which was given in testimony under oath before Alderman , by several females, who testified that endeavored to seduce them and accomplished his designs by saying it was right; that it was one of the mysteries of God, which was to be revealed when the people was strongenough in the faith to bear such mysteries—that it was perfectly right to have illicit intercourse with females, providing no one knew it but themselves, vehemently trying them from day to day, to yield to his passions, bringing witnesses of his own clan to testify that their was such revelations and such commandments, and that it was of God; also stating that he would be responsible for their sins, if their was any; and that he would give them medicine to produce abortions, providing they should become pregnant. One of these witnesses, a married woman that he attended upon in his professional capacity, whilst she was sick, stated that he made proposals to her of a similar nature; he told her that he wished her husband was dead, and that if he was dead he would marry her and clear out out with her; he also begged her permission to give him medicine to that effect; he did try to give him medicine, but he would not take it—on interogating her what she thought of such teaching, she replied, she was sick at the time, and had to be lifted in and out of her bed like a child. Many other acts as criminal were reported to me at the time. On becoming acquainted with these facts, I was determined to prosecute him, and bring him to justice.— Some person knowing my determintion, having informed him of it, he sent to me and , to request an interview with me and to see if their could not be a reconciliation made. I told them I thought there could not be, his crimes were so henious; but told them I was willing to see him; he immediately came to see me; he begged on me to forgive him, this once, and not prosecute him and expose him, he said he was guilty, and did acknowledge the crimes that were alleged against him; he seemed to be sorry that he had commited such acts, and wept much, and desired that it might not be made public, for it would ruin him forever; he wished me to wait; but I was determined to bring him to justice, and declined listening to his entreaties; he then wished me to wait until he could have an interview with the masonic fraternity; he also wanted an interview with Br. Joseph; he wished to know of me, if I would forgive him, and desist from my intentions, if he could obtain their forgiveness; and requested the privilege of an interview immediately. I granted him that privilege as I was acting as master pro. tem. at that time; he also wished an interview first with Br. Joseph; at that time Brother Joseph was crossing the yard from the house to the store, he immediately come to the store and met on the way; he reached out his hand to Br. Joseph and said, will you forgive me, weeping at the time; he said Br. Joseph, I am guilty, I acknowledge it, and I beg of you not to expose me, for it will ruin me; Joseph replied, ! why are you using my name to carry on your helish wickedness? Have I ever taught you that fornication and adultery was right, or poligamy or any such practices? He said you never did. Did I ever teach you any thing that was not virtuous—that was iniquitous, either in public or private? He said you never did. Did you ever know anything unvirtuous or unrighteous in my conduct or actions at any time, either in public or in private? he said, I did not; are you willing to make oath to this before an Alderman of the ? he said I am willing to do so. Joseph said go into my , and write what you can in conscience subscribe your name to, and I will be satisfied—I will, he said, and went into the office, and I went with him and he requested pen ink and paper of , who was acting clerk in that office, and was also secetary pro. tem. for the Nauvoo Lodge U. D. gave him paper, pen and ink, and he stood at the desk and wrote the following article which was published in the 11th No. of the Wasp; sworn to and subscribed before , Alderman, 17th day of May, A. D. 1842; he called in Br. Joseph, and read it to him and asked him if that would do, he said it would, he then swore to it as before mentioned; the article was as follows:
State of Illinois,)
City of .)
Personably appeared before me, , an Alderman of said city of , , who being duly sworn according to law, deposeth and saith: that he never was taught any thing in the least cantrary to the strictest principles [p. [2]]
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