Discourse, 1 March 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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After engaging in prayer to the Most High, and reading a chapter of sacred writ, he commenced his discourse. He told his people he was their servant; that they had a right to know all the incidents of his journey; he would therefore endeavor to give them a minute account. He did not like to preach politics on the Sabbath; but he must free his mind,—must tell the whole story.
The object of his visit at , you well know, was to make application to Congress for relief, touching their troubles in . But to the discourse. He said, on his arrival in , he, with two of his , ( and ,) called on at the “White House” with a letter of introduction, and after making known to him the object of their visit, and soliciting him to help them, replied; “Help you! how can I help you? All would turn against me.” But they demanded of a hearing, and he, after listening a few moments to their tale of injured innocence, abruptly left the room. After waiting some time for his return, they were under the necessity of departing, disappointed, and chagrined.
He thought treated them with great disrespect and neglect. He said while they were with , a member of Congress waited upon him, and in conversation, among other things, told the that he (the ) was getting fat. The replied that he was aware of the fact; that he had to go every few days to the tailor’s to get his clothes let out, or purchase a new coat. The “Prophet” here added, at the top of his voice,— he hoped he would continue to grow fat, and swell, and, before the next election, burst!
He felt at home in the White House, and, while there, thought he began to swell a little himself. He felt that he had a perfect right there, as much right as , because it belonged to the people, and he was one of the people.
He spoke of the success attending his preaching in the Eastern cities; that the people en masse in many places were converted to the Mormon faith. That the striplings which they had sent from this wilderness to preach to the wise men and priests of the great cities, were accomplishing mighty things for the , by confounding the learned priests.
On one occasion, he said, six ministers attended a meeting where a little Mormon fellow was preaching, and undertook to put him down by ridicule: but he stood his ground, and whipped them all out, by fair argument; and the congergation acknowledged en masse that he whipped them all.
Here this spiritual discourse was brought to a close, by a violent shower of rain. After making an appointment to deliver the conclusion, the Prophet dismissed the meeting. [p. [2]]
After engaging in prayer to the Most High, and reading a chapter of sacred writ, he commenced his discourse. He told his people he was their servant; that they had a right to know all the incidents of his journey; he would therefore endeavor to give them a minute account. He did not like to preach politics on the Sabbath; but he must free his mind,—must tell the whole story.
The object of his visit at , you well know, was to make application to Congress for relief, touching their troubles in . But to the discourse. He said, on his arrival in , he, with two of his , ( and ,) called on at the “White House” with a letter of introduction, and after making known to him the object of their visit, and soliciting him to help them, replied; “Help you! how can I help you? All would turn against me.” But they demanded of a hearing, and he, after listening a few moments to their tale of injured innocence, abruptly left the room. After waiting some time for his return, they were under the necessity of departing, disappointed, and chagrined.
He thought treated them with great disrespect and neglect. He said while they were with , a member of Congress waited upon him, and in conversation, among other things, told the that he (the ) was getting fat. The replied that he was aware of the fact; that he had to go every few days to the tailor’s to get his clothes let out, or purchase a new coat. The “Prophet” here added, at the top of his voice,— he hoped he would continue to grow fat, and swell, and, before the next election, burst!
He felt at home in the White House, and, while there, thought he began to swell a little himself. He felt that he had a perfect right there, as much right as , because it belonged to the people, and he was one of the people.
He spoke of the success attending his preaching in the Eastern cities; that the people en masse in many places were converted to the Mormon faith. That the striplings which they had sent from this wilderness to preach to the wise men and priests of the great cities, were accomplishing mighty things for the , by confounding the learned priests.
On one occasion, he said, six ministers attended a meeting where a little Mormon fellow was preaching, and undertook to put him down by ridicule: but he stood his ground, and whipped them all out, by fair argument; and the congergation acknowledged en masse that he whipped them all.
Here this spiritual discourse was brought to a close, by a violent shower of rain. After making an appointment to deliver the conclusion, the Prophet dismissed the meeting. [p. [2]]
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