Discourse, 7 April 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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He said that soon after reaching , he called on , and asked permission to leave with him the memorial with which he had been entrusted, at the same time briefly stating its contents. ’s manner was very repulsive, and it was only after his (Smith’s) urgent request that he consented to receive the paper and to give an answer on the morrow. The next day Smith again called, when cut short the interview by saying, “I can do nothing for you, gentlemen. If I were to, I should go against the whole state of , and that state would go against me at the next election.” Mr. Smith said he was thunderstruck at this avowal. He had always believed to be a high-minded statesman, and had uniformly supported him as such; but he now saw that he was only a huckstering politician, who would sacrifice any and every thing to promote his re-election. He left him abruptly, and rejoiced, when without the walls of the palace, that he could once more breathe the air of a freeman. [p. [2]]
He said that soon after reaching , he called on , and asked permission to leave with him the memorial with which he had been entrusted, at the same time briefly stating its contents. ’s manner was very repulsive, and it was only after his (Smith’s) urgent request that he consented to receive the paper and to give an answer on the morrow. The next day Smith again called, when cut short the interview by saying, “I can do nothing for you, gentlemen. If I were to, I should go against the whole state of , and that state would go against me at the next election.” Mr. Smith said he was thunderstruck at this avowal. He had always believed to be a high-minded statesman, and had uniformly supported him as such; but he now saw that he was only a huckstering politician, who would sacrifice any and every thing to promote his re-election. He left him abruptly, and rejoiced, when without the walls of the palace, that he could once more breathe the air of a freeman. [p. [2]]
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