Doctrine and Covenants, 1835

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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merciful, and gracious, long suffering and full of goodness?
A. It is. -[§ iii. ¶ 20.]-
Q. Why is it necessary?
A. Because of the weakness and imperfections of human nature, and the great frailties of man; for such is the weakness of man, and such his frailties, that he is liable to sin continually, and if God were not long suffering, and full of compassion, gracious and merciful and of a forgiving disposition, man would be cut off from before him in consequence of which, he would be in continual doubt and could not exercise faith: for where doubt is, there faith has no power, but by man’s believing that God is full of compassion and forgiveness, long suffering and slow to anger, he can exercise faith in him and overcome doubt, so as to be exceedingly strong. -[§ iii. ¶ 20.]-
Q. Is it not equally as necessary that man should have an idea that God changes not, neither is there variableness with him, in order to exercise faith in him unto life and salvation?
A. It is; because without this, he would not know how soon the mercy of God might change into cruelty, his long suffering into rashness, his love into hatred, and in consequence of which doubt, man would be incapable of exercising faith in him, but having the idea that he is unchangeable, man can have faith in him continually, believing that what he was yesterday he is to day, and will be forever. -[§ iii. ¶ 21.]-
Q. Is it not necessary also, for men to have an idea that God is a being of truth, before they can have a perfect faith in him?
A. It is; for unless men have this idea they cannot place confidence in his word, and not being able to place confidence in his word, they could not have faith in him; but believing that he is a God of truth, and that his word cannot fail, then faith can rest in him without doubt. -[§ iii. ¶ 22.]-
Q. Could man exercise faith in God so as to obtain eternal life unless he believed that God was no respecter of persons?
A. He could not; because without this idea he could not certainly know that it was his privilege so to do, and in consequence of this doubt his faith could not be sufficiently strong to save him. -[§ iii. ¶ 23.]-
Q. Would it be possible for a man to exercise faith in God, so as to be saved, unless he had an idea that God was love?
A. He could not; because man could not love God, unless he had an idea that God was love, and if he did not love God, he could not have faith in him. -[§ iii. ¶ 24.]-
Q. What is the description which the sacred writers give of the character of the Deity calculated to do?
A. It is calculated to lay a foundation for the exercise of faith in him, as far as the knowledge extends among all people, [p. 43]
merciful, and gracious, long suffering and full of goodness?
A. It is. -[§ iii. ¶ 20.]-
Q. Why is it necessary?
A. Because of the weakness and imperfections of human nature, and the great frailties of man; for such is the weakness of man, and such his frailties, that he is liable to sin continually, and if God were not long suffering, and full of compassion, gracious and merciful and of a forgiving disposition, man would be cut off from before him in consequence of which, he would be in continual doubt and could not exercise faith: for where doubt is, there faith has no power, but by man’s believing that God is full of compassion and forgiveness, long suffering and slow to anger, he can exercise faith in him and overcome doubt, so as to be exceedingly strong. -[§ iii. ¶ 20.]-
Q. Is it not equally as necessary that man should have an idea that God changes not, neither is there variableness with him, in order to exercise faith in him unto life and salvation?
A. It is; because without this, he would not know how soon the mercy of God might change into cruelty, his long suffering into rashness, his love into hatred, and in consequence of which doubt, man would be incapable of exercising faith in him, but having the idea that he is unchangeable, man can have faith in him continually, believing that what he was yesterday he is to day, and will be forever. -[§ iii. ¶ 21.]-
Q. Is it not necessary also, for men to have an idea that God is a being of truth, before they can have a perfect faith in him?
A. It is; for unless men have this idea they cannot place confidence in his word, and not being able to place confidence in his word, they could not have faith in him; but believing that he is a God of truth, and that his word cannot fail, then faith can rest in him without doubt. -[§ iii. ¶ 22.]-
Q. Could man exercise faith in God so as to obtain eternal life unless he believed that God was no respecter of persons?
A. He could not; because without this idea he could not certainly know that it was his privilege so to do, and in consequence of this doubt his faith could not be sufficiently strong to save him. -[§ iii. ¶ 23.]-
Q. Would it be possible for a man to exercise faith in God, so as to be saved, unless he had an idea that God was love?
A. He could not; because man could not love God, unless he had an idea that God was love, and if he did not love God, he could not have faith in him. -[§ iii. ¶ 24.]-
Q. What is the description which the sacred writers give of the character of the Deity calculated to do?
A. It is calculated to lay a foundation for the exercise of faith in him, as far as the knowledge extends among all people, [p. 43]
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