Editorial, 15 July 1842–A

  • Source Note
Page 856
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strength is weakness, his wisdom is folly, his  glory is his shame.
Monarchical, aristocratic, and republican  forms of government, of their various kinds and  grades, have in their turn been raised to digni ty and prostrated in the dust. The plans of the  greatest politicians, the wisest senators, and  most profound statesmen have been exploded;  and the proceedings of the greatest chieftains,  the bravest generals, and the wisest kings have  fallen to the ground. Nation has succeeded  nation, and we have inherited nothing but their  folly. History records their puerile plans, their  short lived glory, their feeble intellect, and their  ignoble deeds.
Have we increased in knowledge or intelli gence? where is there a man that can step  forth and alter the destiny of nations, and pro mote the happiness of the world? Or where is  there a kingdom or nation, that can promote  the universal happiness of its own subjects, or  even their general well being? Our nation,  which possesses greater resources than any oth er, is rent from center to circumference, with  party strife, political intrigue, and sectional in terest; our counsellors are panic struck, our le gislators are astonished, and our senators are  confounded; our merchants are paralized, our  tradesmen are disheartened, our mechanics out  of employ, our farmers distressed, and our poor  crying for bread. Our banks are broken, our  credit ruined, and our states overwhelmed in  debt;—yet we are, and have been in peace.—  What is the matter? Are we alone in this thing?  Verily, no. With all our evils we are better  situated than any other nations. Let Egypt,  Turkey, Spain, , Italy, Portugal, Germa ny, , China, or any other nation speak,  and tell the tale of their trouble—their perplex ity, and distress, and we should find that their  cup was full, and that they were preparing to  drink the dregs of sorrow. , that boasts  of her literature, her science, commerce, &c.,  has her hands reeking with the blood of the in nocent, abroad; and she is saluted with the cries  of the oppressed, at home.—Chartism, O’Con nelism, and Radicalism are gnawing her vitals  at home; and Ireland, Scotland, , and  the East, are threatening her destruction  abroad. is rent to the core—intrigue,  treachery, and treason lurk in the dark; and  murder, and assassination stalk forth at noon day. Turkey, once the glory of European na tions, has been shorn of her strength—has dwin dled into her dotage, and has been obliged to  ask her allies to propose to her tributary terms  of peace: and Russia, and Egypt are each of  [t]hem opening their jaws to devour her. Spain  has been the theatre of bloodshed, of misery and  woe, for years past. Syria is now convulsed  with war and bloodshed. The great and power ful empire of China, which has for centuries re sisted the attacks of barbarians, has become  tributary to a foreign foe; her batteries thrown  down; many of her cities destroyed, and her  villages deserted. We might mention the Eas tern rajahs; the miseries and oppressions of the  Irish; the convulsed state of Central America;  the situation of and Mexico; the state of  Greece, Switzerland, and Poland—nay, the  world itself presents one great theatre of mise ry, woe, and “distress of nations with perplex ity.” All, all speak with a voice of thunder,  that man is not able to govern himself—to le gislate for himself—to protect himself—to pro mote his own good, nor the good of the world.
It has been the design of Jehovah, from the  commencement of the world, and is his purpose  now, to regulate the affairs of the world in his  own time; to stand as head of the universe, and  take the reigns of government into his own  hand. When that is done judgment will be ad ministered in righteousness; anarchy and con fusion will be destroyed, and “nations will  learn war no more.” It is for want of this  great governing principle that all this confusion  has existed; “for it is not in man that walketh  to direct his steps;” this we have fully shewn.
If there was any thing great or good in the  world it came from God. The construction of  the first vessel was given to Noah, by revela tion. The design of the ark was given by God  “a pattern of heavenly things.” The learning  of the Egyptians, and their knowledge of as tronomony was no doubt taught them by Abra ham and Joseph, as their records testify, who  received it from the Lord. The art of working  in brass, silver, gold, and precious stones, was  taught by revelation, in the wilderness. The  architectural designs of the Temple at Jerusa lem, together with its ornament and beauty  was given of God. Wisdom to govern the house  of Israel was given to Solomon, and to the judg es of Israel; and if he had always been their  king, and they subject to his mandate, and obe dient to his laws, they would still have been a  great and mighty people; the rulers of the uni verse—and the wonder of the world. If Nebu chadnezzar, or Darius, or Cyrus, or any other  king possessed knowledge or power it was from  the same source, as the scriptures abundantly  testify. If then, God puts up one, and sets down  another, at his pleasure—and made instruments  of kings, unknown to themselves, to fulfill his  prophesies, how much more was he able, if man  would have been subject to his mandate, to regu [p. 856]
strength is weakness, his wisdom is folly, his glory is his shame.
Monarchical, aristocratic, and republican forms of government, of their various kinds and grades, have in their turn been raised to dignity and prostrated in the dust. The plans of the greatest politicians, the wisest senators, and most profound statesmen have been exploded; and the proceedings of the greatest chieftains, the bravest generals, and the wisest kings have fallen to the ground. Nation has succeeded nation, and we have inherited nothing but their folly. History records their puerile plans, their short lived glory, their feeble intellect, and their ignoble deeds.
Have we increased in knowledge or intelligence? where is there a man that can step forth and alter the destiny of nations, and promote the happiness of the world? Or where is there a kingdom or nation, that can promote the universal happiness of its own subjects, or even their general well being? Our nation, which possesses greater resources than any other, is rent from center to circumference, with party strife, political intrigue, and sectional interest; our counsellors are panic struck, our legislators are astonished, and our senators are confounded; our merchants are paralized, our tradesmen are disheartened, our mechanics out of employ, our farmers distressed, and our poor crying for bread. Our banks are broken, our credit ruined, and our states overwhelmed in debt;—yet we are, and have been in peace.— What is the matter? Are we alone in this thing? Verily, no. With all our evils we are better situated than any other nations. Let Egypt, Turkey, Spain, , Italy, Portugal, Germany, , China, or any other nation speak, and tell the tale of their trouble—their perplexity, and distress, and we should find that their cup was full, and that they were preparing to drink the dregs of sorrow. , that boasts of her literature, her science, commerce, &c., has her hands reeking with the blood of the innocent, abroad; and she is saluted with the cries of the oppressed, at home.—Chartism, O’Connelism, and Radicalism are gnawing her vitals at home; and Ireland, Scotland, , and the East, are threatening her destruction abroad. is rent to the core—intrigue, treachery, and treason lurk in the dark; and murder, and assassination stalk forth at noonday. Turkey, once the glory of European nations, has been shorn of her strength—has dwindled into her dotage, and has been obliged to ask her allies to propose to her tributary terms of peace: and Russia, and Egypt are each of them opening their jaws to devour her. Spain has been the theatre of bloodshed, of misery and woe, for years past. Syria is now convulsed with war and bloodshed. The great and powerful empire of China, which has for centuries resisted the attacks of barbarians, has become tributary to a foreign foe; her batteries thrown down; many of her cities destroyed, and her villages deserted. We might mention the Eastern rajahs; the miseries and oppressions of the Irish; the convulsed state of Central America; the situation of and Mexico; the state of Greece, Switzerland, and Poland—nay, the world itself presents one great theatre of misery, woe, and “distress of nations with perplexity.” All, all speak with a voice of thunder, that man is not able to govern himself—to legislate for himself—to protect himself—to promote his own good, nor the good of the world.
It has been the design of Jehovah, from the commencement of the world, and is his purpose now, to regulate the affairs of the world in his own time; to stand as head of the universe, and take the reigns of government into his own hand. When that is done judgment will be administered in righteousness; anarchy and confusion will be destroyed, and “nations will learn war no more.” It is for want of this great governing principle that all this confusion has existed; “for it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps;” this we have fully shewn.
If there was any thing great or good in the world it came from God. The construction of the first vessel was given to Noah, by revelation. The design of the ark was given by God “a pattern of heavenly things.” The learning of the Egyptians, and their knowledge of astronomony was no doubt taught them by Abraham and Joseph, as their records testify, who received it from the Lord. The art of working in brass, silver, gold, and precious stones, was taught by revelation, in the wilderness. The architectural designs of the Temple at Jerusalem, together with its ornament and beauty was given of God. Wisdom to govern the house of Israel was given to Solomon, and to the judges of Israel; and if he had always been their king, and they subject to his mandate, and obedient to his laws, they would still have been a great and mighty people; the rulers of the universe—and the wonder of the world. If Nebuchadnezzar, or Darius, or Cyrus, or any other king possessed knowledge or power it was from the same source, as the scriptures abundantly testify. If then, God puts up one, and sets down another, at his pleasure—and made instruments of kings, unknown to themselves, to fulfill his prophesies, how much more was he able, if man would have been subject to his mandate, to regu [p. 856]
Page 856