History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 182
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Pres. Smith arose and observed that to the twelve, that the presidency had sat and heard them patiently, and in their turn should expect to be heard patiently by them— also.— And first he remarked that it was necessary that the twelve should state whether they were determined to persevere in the work of the Lord, whether the presidency are able to satisfy them or not.— The of the twelve call[ed] a vote of his quorum, upon this question, which was unanimously carried in the affirmative. Our author then assured them that he had not lost confidence in them, and that they had no reason to suspect his confidence; and that he would be willing to be weighed in the scale of truth to day, with them in this matter, and risk the event in the day of judgment.
And as it respects the chastning contained in the letter in question, which he acknowledged might have been expressed in language to[o] harsh; which was not intentional, and therefore I <​he​> asked their forgivness in as much as he had injured their feelings in concequence of it.— But nevertheless said he the letter that sent back to , while the twelve were at the east, was harsh also and he was willing to set the one against the other. He next proceeded to explain the subject of the duty of the twelve, which is next the and their authority; which is next to that of the first presidency; and that the organization of the council on the 15th Inst, on which occasion the high council of was seated next [to] the presidency; was because the business to be transacted on that day, was business that particularly related to that body.— Not because they were first in office; therefore the arrangement was most judicious that could be made on that occasion.
And furthermore he observed that the twelve are not subject to any other authority in the church, except the first presidency. He also remarked to the twelve that he did not countinance the harsh language of to them; neither did he countinance it in himself, nor any other man; although he had sometimes indulged in it, & spoken to[o] harsh from the impuls of the moment, and wherein he had [p. 182]
Pres. Smith arose and observed to the twelve, that the presidency had sat and heard them patiently, and in their turn should expect to be heard patiently by them— also.— And first he remarked that it was necessary that the twelve should state whether they were determined to persevere in the work of the Lord, whether the presidency are able to satisfy them or not.— The of the twelve called a vote of his quorum, upon this question, which was unanimously carried in the affirmative. Our author then assured them that he had not lost confidence in them, and that they had no reason to suspect his confidence; and that he would be willing to be weighed in the scale of truth to day, with them in this matter, and risk the event in the day of judgment.
And as it respects the chastning contained in the letter in question, which he acknowledged might have been expressed in language too harsh; which was not intentional, and therefore he asked their forgivness in as much as he had injured their feelings in concequence of it.— But nevertheless said he the letter that sent back to , while the twelve were at the east, was harsh also and he was willing to set the one against the other. He next proceeded to explain the subject of the duty of the twelve, and their authority; which is next to that of the first presidency; and that the organization of the council on the 15th Inst, on which occasion the high council of was seated next [to] the presidency; was because the business to be transacted on that day, was business that particularly related to that body.— Not because they were first in office; therefore the arrangement was most judicious that could be made on that occasion.
And furthermore he observed that the twelve are not subject to any other authority in the church, except the first presidency. He also remarked to the twelve that he did not countinance the harsh language of to them; neither did he countinance it in himself, nor any other man; although he had sometimes indulged in it, & spoken too harsh from the impuls of the moment, and wherein he had [p. 182]
Page 182