History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 368
The same night, some of their houses in the village, had long poles thrust through the shutters and sash into the rooms of defenceless women and children, from whence their husbands and fathers had been driven by the dastardly attacks of the Mob, which were made by ten, fifteen, or twenty men upon a house at a time.
2 November 1833 • Saturday
Saturday, the second of November, all the families of the Saints, in the village, moved about half a mile out, with most of their goods; and embodied to the number of thirty, for the preservation of life and personal effects. This night, a party from the village, met a party from west of the Blue, and made an attack upon the b a [HC 1:428] of the , located at the Blue, about six miles from the village; here they tore the roof from one dwelling, and broke open another house, found the owner, David Bennet, sick in bed, whom they beat most inhumanly, swearing they would blow out his brains, and discharged a pistol, the ball of which cut a deep gash across the top of his head. In this skirmish, a young man of the mob, was shot in the thigh; but, by which party remains yet to be determined.
3 November 1833 • Sunday
The next day, Sunday, November 3d, four of the church, namely, , , and two others, were dispatched for Lexington, to see the Circuit Judge, and obtain a peace warrant. Two called on Esquire Silvers, who refused to issue one, on account, as he has declared, of his fears of the Mob. This day many of the citizens, professing friendship, advised the saints to clear from the , as speedily as possible; for the Saturday night affray had enraged the whole , and they were determined to come out on Monday, and Massacre indiscriminately; and in short it was a proverbial among the mob, that “monday would be a bloody day.”
4 November 1833 • Monday
Monday came, and a large party of the mob gathered at the Blue, took the ferry boat, belonging [p. 368]
The same night, some of their houses in the village, had long poles thrust through the shutters and sash into the rooms of defenceless women and children, from whence their husbands and fathers had been driven by the dastardly attacks of the Mob, which were made by ten, fifteen, or twenty men upon a house at a time.
2 November 1833 • Saturday
Saturday, the second of November, all the families of the Saints, in the village, moved about half a mile out, with most of their goods; and embodied to the number of thirty, for the preservation of life and personal effects. This night, a party from the village, met a party from west of the Blue, and made an attack upon a [HC 1:428] of the , located at the Blue, about six miles from the village; here they tore the roof from one dwelling, and broke open another house, found the owner, David Bennet, sick in bed, whom they beat most inhumanly, swearing they would blow out his brains, and discharged a pistol, the ball of which cut a deep gash across the top of his head. In this skirmish, a young man of the mob, was shot in the thigh; but, by which party remains yet to be determined.
3 November 1833 • Sunday
The next day, Sunday, November 3d, four of the church, namely, , , and two others, were dispatched for Lexington, to see the Circuit Judge, and obtain a peace warrant. Two called on Esquire Silvers, who refused to issue one, on account, as he has declared, of his fears of the Mob. This day many of the citizens, professing friendship, advised the saints to clear from the , as speedily as possible; for the Saturday night affray had enraged the whole , and they were determined to come out on Monday, and Massacre indiscriminately; and in short it was proverbial among the mob, that “monday would be a bloody day.”
4 November 1833 • Monday
Monday came, and a large party of the mob gathered at the Blue, took the ferry boat, belonging [p. 368]
Page 368