History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 371
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been a palace, compared to a court room, where dignity and mercy were strangers; and naught but the wrath of man, in horrid threats, stifled the ears of the prisoners,
The same night the prisoners, , , and , were liberated from jail, that they might have an interview with their brethren, and try to negotiate some measures for peace; and on their return to jail, about 2 o’clock, Tuesday morning, in the custody of the Deputy Sheriff, an armed force, of six or seven men, stood near the jail, and hailed; they were answered by the sheriff, who gave his name, and the names of his prisoners, crying “dont fire, dont fire,” the prisoners are in my charge,” &c. They however fired one or two guns, when and retreated;, but stood, with several guns presented at him, firmly held by the sheriff. Two, more desperate than the rest, attempted to shoot, but one of their guns flashed, and the other missed fire. was then knocked down by Thomas Wilson, a grocer in the village. About this time a few of the inhabitants arrived, and again entered <the> jail, from which, he, with three of his brethren, were liberated about sunrise, without farther prosecution of the trial. , was one of the prisoners.
5–7 November 1833 • Tuesday–Thursday
On the morning of the 5th of November, the village began to be crowded with individuals from dif[HC 1:432]ferent parts of the country , with guns, &c, and report said the militia had been called out, under the Sanction, or instigation of ; and that one had the command. Among this militia (so called,) were embodied the most conspicuous characters of the mob; and <it> may truly be said, that the appearance of the ranks of this body was well calculated to excite suspicions of their horerable <Horrible> designs. Very early on the same morning, several of the received intelligence, that a number of their brethren were in prison, and the determination of the mob was to kill them; and, that the branch of the church near the village of , was in imminent danger, [p. 371]
been a palace, compared to a court room, where dignity and mercy were strangers; and naught but the wrath of man, in horrid threats, stifled the ears of the prisoners,
The same night the prisoners, , , and , were liberated from jail, that they might have an interview with their brethren, and try to negotiate some measures for peace; and on their return to jail, about 2 o’clock, Tuesday morning, in the custody of the Deputy Sheriff, an armed force, of six or seven men, stood near the jail, and hailed; they were answered by the sheriff, who gave his name, and the names of his prisoners, crying “dont fire, dont fire,” the prisoners are in my charge,” &c. They however fired one or two guns, when and retreated;, but stood, with several guns presented at him, firmly held by the sheriff. Two, more desperate than the rest, attempted to shoot, but one of their guns flashed, and the other missed fire. was then knocked down by Thomas Wilson, a grocer in the village. About this time a few of the inhabitants arrived, and again entered the jail, from which, he, with three of his brethren, were liberated about sunrise, without farther prosecution of the trial. , was one of the prisoners.
5–7 November 1833 • Tuesday–Thursday
On the morning of the 5th of November, the village began to be crowded with individuals from dif[HC 1:432]ferent parts of the , with guns, &c, and report said the militia had been called out, under the Sanction, or instigation of ; and that one had the command. Among this militia (so called,) were embodied the most conspicuous characters of the mob; and it may truly be said, that the appearance of the ranks of this body was well calculated to excite suspicions of their Horrible designs. Very early on the same morning, several of the received intelligence, that a number of their brethren were in prison, and the determination of the mob was to kill them; and, that the branch of the church near the village of , was in imminent danger, [p. 371]
Page 371