History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 434
the charges in the declaration had been fairly sustained by good witnesses, also that Hodges ought to have confessed when rebuked by ; also if he had the Spirit of the Lord at the meetings where he hollooed, he must have abused it, and grieved it away. All the council agreed with the decision.
Elder Hodges then rose, and said, he then— “saw his wrong” but never saw it before, and appeared to feel thankful that he saw it. He said he had learned more during this trial, than he had since he came into the , confessed freely his error, and said he would attend to overcoming that evil, the Lord being his helper.” The council forgave him, and adjourned to the evening of the 20th.
& , clerks,”
19 February 1834 • Wednesday
This day, also the brethren in , Missouri wrote as follows
. 19th. February, 1834.
“To the Honorable .
Judge of the fifth circuit of ,— Sir, Learning that a court of enquiry is to be held in , at the next regular term of the circuit Court for that county, or that some kind of legal proceedings, is to be commenced for the purpose of obtaining the facts, as far as can be, or bringing to punishment the guilty in that county;
We therefore pray your Honor to avail yourself of every means in your power to execute the law and make it honorable; and believing that the testimony of some of the members of our will be important, and deeming it unsafe to risque our persons in that without a guard, we request, that the order from the Executive already transmitted may be put in force. Respectfully, &c.
(Signed) ,
, ,
, ,”
Another request similar to the above was sent, same date, to , Circuit Attorney. [p. 434]
the charges in the declaration had been fairly sustained by good witnesses, also that Hodges ought to have confessed when rebuked by ; also if he had the Spirit of the Lord at the meetings where he hollooed, he must have abused it, and grieved it away. All the council agreed with the decision.
Elder Hodges then rose, and said, he then— “saw his wrong” but never saw it before, and appeared to feel thankful that he saw it. He said he had learned more during this trial, than he had since he came into the , confessed freely his error, and said he would attend to overcoming that evil, the Lord being his helper.” The council forgave him, and adjourned to the evening of the 20th.
& , clerks,”
19 February 1834 • Wednesday
This day, also the brethren in , Missouri wrote as follows
. 19th. February, 1834.
“To the Honorable .
Judge of the fifth circuit of ,— Sir, Learning that a court of enquiry is to be held in , at the next regular term of the circuit Court for that county, or that some kind of legal proceedings, is to be commenced for the purpose of obtaining the facts, as far as can be, or bringing to punishment the guilty in that county;
We therefore pray your Honor to avail yourself of every means in your power to execute the law and make it honorable; and believing that the testimony of some of the members of our will be important, and deeming it unsafe to risque our persons in that without a guard, we request, that the order from the Executive already transmitted may be put in force. Respectfully, &c.
(Signed) ,
, ,
, ,”
Another request similar to the above was sent, same date, to , Circuit Attorney. [p. 434]
Page 434