History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 8 [addenda]
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to see if they could find out who the leader of the was. the Doctor replied, we have no one in particular. They asked if we had not a general to take the lead of the Company? The reply was, no one in particular. But said they, is not there some one among you, who you call your Captain, or leader, or superior to the rest? He answered sometimes one and sometimes another takes charge of the company so as not to throw the burthen upon any one in particular. These were spies who had come from the West passed us <several times> that same day & the next. (see page 480)+
Addenda, Note 4 • 18–24 May 1834
<No. 4> we would pass the place <Indianapolis> without the people knowing it, when near the place we all <many> got into our <the> Waggons, & separating some little distance, passed through Indianapolis, <the City, while others walked down different streets> leaving the Inhabitants wondering “when that <big> company would come along,” no one having discovered us.
Thursday 22 we encamped on a small stream of water, in a Grove near Belle ville.
Friday 23 we encamped about four miles from Greencastle after a hard drive.
Saturday 24 we crossed the Wabash River at Clinton <in Ferry boats.> in quick time, pushed on to the State line; where we arrived late in the evening and encamped in an oak opening— <in Edgar county, Illinois.> (see page 481)*
Addenda, Note 5 • 25–26 May 1834
<No. 5> Some time this day a man in disguise, having on an old seal skin cap, came into our Camp, he swore we “were going up to , and that we should never get there <over the Mississippi alive> alive &c &c it was evident he was a spy, and I recollected having seen him in , Missouri
Monday 26 <Very hot day.> we travelled <thro’ Paris and> across a sixteen mile prairie, at noon we stopt to bait at a slough, about six miles from the timber, having no water to drink, but such as was filled with living animals commonly called Wiglers, and as we did not like to swallow them we strained the water through our teeth, which saved the life of many a poor animal, this was the first prairie of any magnitude that we had come to on our journey, and was a great curiosity to many of the brethren, it was so very level that the deer miles off appeared but a short distance; some of the brethren started in pursuit before they were apprised of their mistake, in the distance— we continued our march pulling our waggons thro’ a small creek with ropes, and came to the house of a Mr. Wayne the only settler <in the vicinity> in that immediate neighborhood where we found a well of water, which was one of the greatest comforts that we could have received, as we were almost famished, and it was a long time before we could, or dared to satisfy our thirst: we crossed the Embarros River and encamped on a small branch of the same about one mile West— in pitching my tent we found three Massasaugers or Prairie Rattle Snakes which the brethren were about to kill, but I said let them alone, don’t hurt them, how will the serpent ever lose its venom, while the servants of God possess the same disposition, and continue to make war upon them, men must become harmless before the brute creation, and when men lose their vicious dispositions and cease to destroy the animal race, the lion and the lamb can dwell together, and the sucking child play with the serpent with safety; the brethren took the serpents carefully on sticks, and carried them across the creek— I exhorted the brethren not to kill a serpent, bird, or and any animal of any kind, during our journey unless it— were necessary to preserve ourselves from hunger— I had frequently spoken on this subject, when on a certain occasion I came up to the brethren who were watching a squirrel on a tree, and to prove them and know if they would heed my Counsel— I took one of their guns, shot the squirrel and passed on, leaving the Squirrel on the ground— brother who was just behind, came up, picked up the Squirrel, and said we will Cook this, that nothing may be lost— I perceived that the brethren understood what I did it for, and in their practice gave more heed to my precept than my example, which was right. This Evening brothers and returned from the Branch, Indiana (where I had sent them) with a company of about a dozen men— The reports of mobs which were continually saluting our ears, caused the brethren to be constantly alive to the subject, and about eleven o’clock this evening our picket guards reported that [p. 8 [addenda]]
to see if they could find out who the leader of the was. the Doctor replied, we have no one in particular. They asked if we had not a general to take the lead of the Company? The reply was, no one in particular. But said they, is not there some one among you, who you call your Captain, or leader, or superior to the rest? He answered sometimes one and sometimes another takes charge of the company so as not to throw the burthen upon any one in particular. These spies who had come from the West passed us several times that same day & the next. (see page 480)+
Addenda, Note 4 • 18–24 May 1834
No. 4 we would pass Indianapolis without the people knowing it, when near the place many got into the Waggons, & separating some little distance, passed through , the City, while others walked down different streets leaving the Inhabitants wondering “when that big company would come along,”
Thursday 22 we encamped on a small stream of water, in a Grove near Belle ville.
Friday 23 we encamped about four miles from Greencastle after a hard drive.
Saturday 24 we crossed the Wabash River at Clinton in Ferry boats. in quick time, pushed on to the State line; where we arrived late in the evening and encamped in an oak opening— in Edgar county, Illinois. (see page 481)*
Addenda, Note 5 • 25–26 May 1834
No. 5 a man in disguise, having on an old seal skin cap, came into our Camp, he swore we “were going up to , and that we should never get over the Mississippi alive alive it was evident he was a spy, and I recollected having seen him in , Missouri
Monday 26 Very hot day. we travelled thro’ Paris and across a sixteen mile prairie, at noon we stopt to bait at a slough, about six miles from the timber, having no water to drink, but such as was filled with living animals commonly called Wiglers, and as we did not like to swallow them we strained the water through our teeth, which saved the life of many a poor animal, this was the first prairie of any magnitude that we had come to on our journey, and was a great curiosity to many of the brethren, it was so very level that the deer miles off appeared but a short distance; some of the brethren started in pursuit before they were apprised of their mistake, — we continued our march pulling our waggons thro’ a small creek with ropes, and came to the house of Mr. Wayne the only settler in the vicinity where we found a well of water, which was one of the greatest comforts that we could have received, as we were almost famished, and it was a long time before we could, or dared to satisfy our thirst: we crossed the Embarros River and encamped on a small branch of the same about one mile West— in pitching my tent we found three Massasaugers or Prairie Rattle Snakes which the brethren were about to kill, but I said let them alone, don’t hurt them, how will the serpent ever lose its venom, while the servants of God possess the same disposition, and continue to make war upon them, men must become harmless before the brute creation, and when men lose their vicious dispositions and cease to destroy the animal race, the lion and the lamb can dwell together, and the sucking child play with the serpent with safety; the brethren took the serpents carefully on sticks, and carried them across the creek— I exhorted the brethren not to kill a serpent, bird, or any animal of any kind, during our journey unless it— were necessary to preserve ourselves from hunger— I had frequently spoken on this subject, when on a certain occasion I came up to the brethren who were watching a squirrel on a tree, and to prove them and know if they would heed my Counsel— I took one of their guns, shot the squirrel and passed on, leaving the Squirrel on the ground— brother who was just behind, came up, picked up the Squirrel, and said we will Cook this, that nothing may be lost— I perceived that the brethren understood what I did it for, and in their practice gave more heed to my precept than my example, which was right. This Evening brothers and returned from the Branch, Indiana (where I had sent them) with a company of about a dozen men— The reports of mobs which were continually saluting our ears, caused the brethren to be constantly alive to the subject, and about eleven o’clock this evening our picket guards reported that [p. 8 [addenda]]
Page 8 [addenda]