History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 976
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<​November 28 Petition to Congress​> called upon the leading Mormons of the place, they announced that the , the , and the Shops must be closed, and that forthwith every Mormon must leave the . The message was so terrible, so unexpected, the Mormons asked time for deliberation, and consultation— Which being refused, the brethren were severally asked, are you willing to abandon your home? the reply was, we will not go, which determination being reported to the Committee of the Mob, One of them replied that he was sorry, for said he, the work of destruction must now begin. No sooner said, than it was done, The , a two story brick building was assailed by the Mob and tore down, and with its valuable appurtenances destroyed, They next proceeded to the with a like purpose. Its owner in part, agreed to close it, and they delayed their purpose. They then proceeded to the dwelling of , the beloved Bishop of the Church there, dragged him and his family to the Public Square, where, surrounded by hundreds they partially stripped him of his clothing, and tarred and feathered him from head to foot. A man by the name of was at the same time treated in a similar manner. The mob then dispersed with an agreement to meet again on the next Tuesday, the above outrages having been committed on Saturday. Tuesday came, and with it came the Mob, bearing a red flag in token of blood. They proceeded to the houses of and others, of the leading Men, and seized them, telling them to bid their families farewell, that they would never see them again. They were then driven at the point of the bayonet to the Jail, and there amid the jeers and [HC 4:25] insults of the Crowd, they were thrust in Prison to be kept as hostages, in case any of the Mob should be killed, they were to die to pay for it. Here some two or three of the Mormons offered to surrender up their lives, if that would satisfy the fury of the Mob, and purchase peace and security for their unoffending brethren, their helpless wives and children. The reply of the Mob was, that the Mormons must leave the “en masse”, or, that every man should be put to death. The Mormons terrified and defenceless then entered into an agreement to leave the , one half by the first of January the other half by the first of April next ensuing. This treaty being made and ratified, the Mob dispersed— Again for a time the persecuted Mormons enjoyed a respite from their persecutions, but not long was the repose permitted them. Some time in the Month of October a meeting was held at , at which it was determined to remove the Mormons or die. Inflamatory speeches were made, and one of the Speakers swore he would remove the Mormons from the , if he had to wade up to his neck in blood. Be it remarked that up to this time the Mormons had faithfully observed the treaty, and were guilty of no offence against the laws of the Land, or of Society, but were peaceably following the routine of their daily duties, shortly after the meeting above referred to, another persecution commenced, some of the Mormons were shot at, others were whipped, their houses were assailed with brick bats, broken open, and thrown down, their women and children were insulted, and thus for many weeks without offence, without resistance, by night and by day, were they harassed insulted and oppressed. There is a point [p. 976]
November 28 Petition to Congress called upon the leading Mormons of the place, they announced that the , the , and the Shops must be closed, and that forthwith every Mormon must leave the . The message was so terrible, so unexpected, the Mormons asked time for deliberation, and consultation— Which being refused, the brethren were severally asked, are you willing to abandon your home? the reply was, we will not go, which determination being reported to the Committee of the Mob, One of them replied that he was sorry, for said he, the work of destruction must now begin. No sooner said, than it was done, The , a two story brick building was assailed by the Mob and tore down, and with its valuable appurtenances destroyed, They next proceeded to the with a like purpose. Its owner in part, agreed to close it, and they delayed their purpose. They then proceeded to the dwelling of , the beloved Bishop of the Church there, dragged him and his family to the Public Square, where, surrounded by hundreds they partially stripped him of his clothing, and tarred and feathered him from head to foot. A man by the name of was at the same time treated in a similar manner. The mob then dispersed with an agreement to meet again on the next Tuesday, the above outrages having been committed on Saturday. Tuesday came, and with it came the Mob, bearing a red flag in token of blood. They proceeded to the houses of and others, of the leading Men, and seized them, telling them to bid their families farewell, that they would never see them again. They were then driven at the point of the bayonet to the Jail, and there amid the jeers and [HC 4:25] insults of the Crowd, they were thrust in Prison to be kept as hostages, in case any of the Mob should be killed, they were to die to pay for it. Here some two or three of the Mormons offered to surrender up their lives, if that would satisfy the fury of the Mob, and purchase peace and security for their unoffending brethren, their helpless wives and children. The reply of the Mob was, that the Mormons must leave the “en masse”, or, that every man should be put to death. The Mormons terrified and defenceless then entered into an agreement to leave the , one half by the first of January the other half by the first of April next ensuing. This treaty being made and ratified, the Mob dispersed— Again for a time the persecuted Mormons enjoyed a respite from their persecutions, but not long was the repose permitted them. Some time in the Month of October a meeting was held at , at which it was determined to remove the Mormons or die. Inflamatory speeches were made, and one of the Speakers swore he would remove the Mormons from the , if he had to wade up to his neck in blood. Be it remarked that up to this time the Mormons had faithfully observed the treaty, and were guilty of no offence against the laws of the Land, or of Society, but were peaceably following the routine of their daily duties, shortly after the meeting above referred to, another persecution commenced, some of the Mormons were shot at, others were whipped, their houses were assailed with brick bats, broken open, and thrown down, their women and children were insulted, and thus for many weeks without offence, without resistance, by night and by day, were they harassed insulted and oppressed. There is a point [p. 976]
Page 976