History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​January 6​> and went some 35 or 40 miles, to a large branch of the church in N. J. which numbers 90 members; there I left him on New Years day, and came to where I am at present. Elder Winchester had when I left , baptized 45 in that City, and several more had given in their names for baptism, and scores believing. I preached in Pa. about two weeks, and I think I may safely say there are hundreds believing. The work is prospering throughout all this region. Elders , , and sailed for , Decr. 18th. while I was in none of the rest of the Twelve have yet arrived— has another book printed, larger than the voice of warning, entitled the Millenium, and other poems, and a piece on the eternal duration of matter—” [HC 4:54]
Jan 6th. 1840— Gentlemen— Your letter of the 19th. ult came to hand ten days after date, immediately after which, I called on many of the prominent members of the Democratic party, with a view to unite them and their influence in your behalf; all of whom expressed a willingness to aid in bringing about justice. But I regret to inform you that but few have exhibited that energy in the matter which might reasonably be expected from all lovers of liberty and advocates of equal rights. Your energetic friends were first of the opinion that an effort ought to be made by our Legislature to memorialize our Representatives in Con[HC 4:55]gress to use all honorable means to accomplish your desires; but after holding a consultation, it was believed that such a course would create a party strife here, and consequently operate against you in Congress; Therefore it was agreed that as many as had friends in Congress should write to them immediately, desiring their aid in your behalf. If convenient you will please write again, any information respecting your mission will be thankfully received, and made known to your people here. Very respectfully yours— .” To Revd. Jos. Smith and his Associate—
“I hereby Certify that General and his aide at their arrival at in Caldwell County Missouri, came to my Tavern stand, and without my leave pitched their Marquees in my Yard, and did take my wood and hay to furnish the same, and did bring their horses in also, and without my leave take hay for them, and did take possession of my house, and use it for a Council house; and did place a strong guard around it, so as to hinder any person from going in or out; and I myself was not permitted to go in and out, for all this I have received no remuneration, and was not even permitted to pass out of town— to water Travellers horses without a permit; the above took place in the first part of November 1838. I also Certify that , , , Joseph Smith Junr. and in Missouri did apply for a Writ of Habeas Corpus and did not get it— .” Sworn before J.P.”
“I certify that I saw General and his aide on their arrival at [p. 1009]
January 6 and went some 35 or 40 miles, to a large branch of the church in N. J. which numbers 90 members; there I left him on New Years day, and came to where I am at present. Elder Winchester had when I left , baptized 45 in that City, and several more had given in their names for baptism, and scores believing. I preached in Pa. about two weeks, and I think I may safely say there are hundreds believing. The work is prospering throughout all this region. Elders , , and sailed for , Decr. 18th. while I was in none of the rest of the Twelve have yet arrived— has another book printed, larger than the voice of warning, entitled the Millenium, and other poems, and a piece on the eternal duration of matter—” [HC 4:54]
Jan 6th. 1840— Gentlemen— Your letter of the 19th. ult came to hand ten days after date, immediately after which, I called on many of the prominent members of the Democratic party, with a view to unite them and their influence in your behalf; all of whom expressed a willingness to aid in bringing about justice. But I regret to inform you that but few have exhibited that energy in the matter which might reasonably be expected from all lovers of liberty and advocates of equal rights. Your energetic friends were first of the opinion that an effort ought to be made by our Legislature to memorialize our Representatives in Con[HC 4:55]gress to use all honorable means to accomplish your desires; but after holding a consultation, it was believed that such a course would create a party strife here, and consequently operate against you in Congress; Therefore it was agreed that as many as had friends in Congress should write to them immediately, desiring their aid in your behalf. If convenient you will please write again, any information respecting your mission will be thankfully received, and made known to your people here. Very respectfully yours— .” To Revd. Jos. Smith and his Associate—
“I hereby Certify that General and his aide at their arrival at in Caldwell County Missouri, came to my Tavern stand, and without my leave pitched their Marquees in my Yard, and did take my wood and hay to furnish the same, and did bring their horses in also, and without my leave take hay for them, and did take possession of my house, and use it for a Council house; and did place a strong guard around it, so as to hinder any person from going in or out; and I myself was not permitted to go in and out, for all this I have received no remuneration, and was not even permitted to pass out of town— to water Travellers horses without a permit; the above took place in the first part of November 1838. I also Certify that , , , Joseph Smith Junr. and in Missouri did apply for a Writ of Habeas Corpus and did not get it— .” Sworn before J.P.”
“I certify that I saw General and his aide on their arrival at [p. 1009]
Page 1009