History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​February 22​> I flatly denied it, saying that no such ever existed, nor was thought of among the Mormons, and I could bring all the Mormons both men, women and children besides myself that would swear before all the world, that no such thing ever existed <​nor was thought of​> among the Mormons. He then related some things which he said had told him at the Legislature, in ; which were to the effect, that the Mormons had burnt a number of Houses in , and that for himself, if he could not get to Heaven by being an honest man, he would never go there; then I, speaking of some of the dissenters, told him was anxious to get in the Church again; and that it was the fact in regard to damages having been done, after we had been driven from and , relating the scrape, and calling of the Militia, and the Mobs marching to , and saying they would drive the Mormons from there to , and then to hell; their burning our houses; that small parties on both sides were on the alert, and probably done some damages; though I was not personally knowing to, as I was not there. I told him Joseph Smith held no office in the Country, neither was he a military man, and did not take Gun in hand in the affair to my knowledge; I then stated that ’s Affidavit, which contained some important facts was before them, which facts I forgot to mention yesterday, importing that he () was convinced we would get no redress in (he being a member of the Legislature ought to know) I saw the Chairman of the Committee not long since, who informed me that the Committee had not come to a final conclusion on this matter as yet. I saw on the walk, who said the first thing the Com[HC 4:86]mittee would do, was to decide whether they would take it up and consider it or not, and if they do take it up according to — — — — — — request, the Senate will grant the Committee power to send for persons and papers. The Committee made some enquiries respecting our religion, and I answered them as a matter of course as well as I was able. They enquired very particularly concerning how much land we had entered there, and how much of it yet remained unsold, when Mr. Corwin observed that we had never entered much land there, but were squatters, I then described the size of and Counties, giving an explanation on these matters. I suppose perhaps on Monday or Tuesday we shall know something relative to this matter; whether power be given them to send for persons and papers, You may see where they depend to rally their forces viz. by endeavoring to make us treasonable characters, by the Constitution, said to govern us, and that every thing both civil and political, among us is done by revelation. These points I desire to blow to the four winds, and that you will select a number of firm brethren, possessing good understanding; who will tell the truth, and willingly send me their names when they know they are wanted, send plenty of them. They will get two dollars per day, and ten cents a mile to and from, expence money. Do not send [p. 1021]
February 22 I flatly denied it, , , and I could bring all the Mormons both men, women and children besides myself that would swear before all the world, that no such thing ever existed nor was thought of among the Mormons. He then related some things which he said had told him at the Legislature, in ; which were to the effect, that the Mormons had burnt a number of Houses in , and that for himself, if he could not get to Heaven by being an honest man, he would never go there; then I, speaking of some of the dissenters, told him was anxious to get in the Church again; and that it was the fact in regard to damages having been done, after we had been driven from and , relating the scrape, and calling of the Militia, and the Mobs marching to , and saying they would drive the Mormons from there to , and then to hell; their burning our houses; that small parties on both sides were on the alert, and probably done some damages; though I was not personally knowing to, as I was not there. I told him Joseph Smith held no office in the Country, neither was he a military man, and did not take Gun in hand in the affair to my knowledge; I then stated that ’s Affidavit, which contained some important facts was before them, which facts I forgot to mention yesterday, importing that he () was convinced we would get no redress in (he being a member of the Legislature ought to know) I saw the Chairman of the Committee not long since, who informed me that the Committee had not come to a final conclusion on this matter as yet. I saw on the walk, who said the first thing the Com[HC 4:86]mittee would do, was to decide whether they would take it up and consider it or not, and if they do take it up according to — — — — — — request, the Senate will grant the Committee power to send for persons and papers. The Committee made some enquiries respecting our religion, and I answered them as a matter of course as well as I was able. They enquired very particularly concerning how much land we had entered there, and how much of it yet remained unsold, when Mr. Corwin observed that we had never entered much land there, but were squatters, I then described the size of and Counties, giving an explanation on these matters. I suppose perhaps on Monday or Tuesday we shall know something relative to this matter; whether power be given them to send for persons and papers, You may see where they depend to rally their forces viz. by endeavoring to make us treasonable characters, by the Constitution, said to govern us, and that every thing both civil and political, among us is done by revelation. These points I desire to blow to the four winds, and that you will select a number of firm brethren, possessing good understanding; who will tell the truth, and willingly send me their names when they know they are wanted, send plenty of them. They will get two dollars per day, and ten cents a mile to and from, expence money. Do not send [p. 1021]
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