History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​July 1​> at all; stating that this was not a court to try the case; but only a court of investigation on the part of the . Upon this, arose, and said ‘he would be God damned if the Witness should not be sworn, and that it was a damned shame that these defendants should be treated in this manner; that they could not be permitted to get one witness before the court, whilst all their witnesses, even forty at a time, have been taken by force of arms, and thrust into “that <​damned​> bull-penin order to prevent them from giving their testimony.’ After sat down, the permitted the witness to be sworn, and enter upon his testimony. But so soon as he began to speak, a man by the name of Cook, who was a brother-in-Law to Priest , the Methodist, and who was a lieutenant, and whose place at that time, was to superintend the guard, stepped in before the pretended court, and took him by the nape of his neck and jammed his head down under the pole or log of wood, that was around the place where the inquisition was sitting; to keep the by-standers from intruding upon the majesty of the inquisitions, and jammed him along to the door, and kicked him out of doors. He instantly turned to some soldiers who were standing by him and said to them, ‘go and shoot him, damn him, shoot him damn him.’
The soldiers ran after the man to shoot him, he fled for his life and with great difficulty made his escape. The pretended court immediately arose, and we were ordered to be carried to , Clay County, and [HC 3:419] there to be thrust into jail. We endeavored to find out for what cause, but all that we could learn was because we were Mormons. The next morning a large wagon drove up to the door, and a black smith came into the house with some chains and handcuffs, he said his orders were from the , to handcuff us, and chain us together, he informed us that the had made out a , and sentenced us to jail for treason; he also said the judge had done this that we might not get bail; he also said the stated his intention to keep us in jail until all the Mormons were driven out of the ; he also said <​that​> the judge had further stated that if he let us out before the Mormons had left the , that we would not let them leave, and there would be another damned fuss kicked up; I also heard the say whilst he was sitting in his pretended court, that there was no law for us, nor for the Mormons, in the State of ; that he had sworn to see them exterminated, and to see the s order executed to the very letter, and that he would do so; however, the blacksmith proceeded and put the irons upon us, and we were ordered into the wagon and they drove off for , and as we journeyed along on the road, we were exhibited to the inhabitants and this course was adopted all the way, thus making a public exhibition of us, until we arrived at , Clay County. There we were thrust into prison again, and locked up— and were held there in close confinement for the space of six months, and our place of lodging was the square side of a hewed white oak log— and our food was any thing but good and decent; poison was administered to us three or four times, the effect it had upon our system was, that it vomited us almost to death, and then we would lay some two or three days in a torpid, stupid state, not even caring or wishing for life. The poison being administered in too large doses, or it would inintably have proved fatal, had not [p. 1615]
July 1 at all; stating that this was not a court to try the case; but only a court of investigation on the part of the . Upon this, arose, and said ‘he would be God damned if the Witness should not be sworn, and that it was a damned shame that these defendants should be treated in this manner; that they could not be permitted to get one witness before the court, whilst all their witnesses, even forty at a time, have been taken by force of arms, and thrust into “that damned bull-pen” in order to prevent them from giving their testimony.’ After sat down, the permitted the witness to be sworn, and enter upon his testimony. But so soon as he began to speak, a man by the name of Cook, who was a brother-in-Law to Priest , the Methodist, and who was a lieutenant, and whose place at that time, was to superintend the guard, stepped in before the pretended court, and took him by the nape of his neck and jammed his head down under the pole or log of wood, that was around the place where the inquisition was sitting; to keep the by-standers from intruding upon the majesty of the inquisitions, and jammed him along to the door, and kicked him out of doors. He instantly turned to some soldiers who were standing by him and said to them, ‘go and shoot him, damn him, shoot him damn him.’
The soldiers ran after the man to shoot him, he fled for his life and with great difficulty made his escape. The pretended court immediately arose, and we were ordered to be carried to , Clay County, and [HC 3:419] there to be thrust into jail. We endeavored to find out for what cause, but all that we could learn was because we were Mormons. The next morning a large wagon drove up to the door, and a black smith came into the house with some chains and handcuffs, he said his orders were from the , to handcuff us, and chain us together, he informed us that the had made out a , and sentenced us to jail for treason; he also said the judge had done this that we might not get bail; he also said the stated his intention to keep us in jail until all the Mormons were driven out of the ; he also said that the judge had further stated that if he let us out before the Mormons had left the , that we would not let them leave, and there would be another damned fuss kicked up; I also heard the say whilst he was sitting in his pretended court, that there was no law for us, nor for the Mormons, in the State of ; that he had sworn to see them exterminated, and to see the s order executed to the very letter, and that he would do so; however, the blacksmith proceeded and put the irons upon us, and we were ordered into the wagon and they drove off for , and as we journeyed along on the road, we were exhibited to the inhabitants and this course was adopted all the way, thus making a public exhibition of us, until we arrived at , Clay County. There we were thrust into prison again, and locked up— and were held there in close confinement for the space of six months, and our place of lodging was the square side of a hewed white oak log— and our food was any thing but good and decent; poison was administered to us three or four times, the effect it had upon our system was, that it vomited us almost to death, and then we would lay some two or three days in a torpid, stupid state, not even caring or wishing for life. The poison being administered in too large doses, or it would inintably have proved fatal, had not [p. 1615]
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