History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​September 13​> regard to that place and people is very erroneous. During his residence there he became quite familiar with their manners, principles and habits, and says there is not a more industrious, moral and well ordered town in the country. Society is as much diversified there as it is here, the Mormons constituting about two thirds of he population, while all religious sects are as freely tolerated as in any other part of the . He was at the late trial and acquital of Joseph Smith, and says that the charges against him were of the most frivolous and unsubstantial nature. He is an agreeable man in conversation, is respected by those who know him and is ‘as much sinned against as sinning’. He only claims the privilege of exercising and enjoying his own religion— a privilege which he and his followers cheerfully award to others. They invite immigrants to come among them, and receive those who design to enter into the Mormon community with great attention and kindness. Houses are prepared for their reception, to which they are conducted on their arrival, by a Committee appointed for that purpose, whose next business it is to attend to their immediate wants and see them comfortably situated. Education is by no means neglected— proper schools and teachers being provided; and temperance reigns throughout. It has now about 15 to 18.000 inhabitants and promises to become a place of extensive business, four or five steamboats stopping there every day. [HC 6:32] The gentleman remarked to us that he wished he could speak as well of his own native town as he could of . This is news to us, as no doubt it will be to many, but no one who knows him can doubt the integrity of our informant.”
I insert the doings of the Anti-Mormon meeting at as published in the Warsaw Message of this date, as a most diabolical specimen of black-hearted corruption and falsehood ever spread upon paper; <​see addenda page 3.​>
14 September 1843 • Thursday
<​14​> Thursday 14. I attended a second lecture on Socialism by Mr Finch; and after he got through, I made a few remarks alluding to and getting up a community at , and of the big fish there eating up all the little fish. I said I did not believe the doctrine. Mr Finch replied a few minutes, and said “I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness— I am the Spiritual prophet— Mr. Smith the temporal.”
Elder replied to the lecture at some length.
15 September 1843 • Friday
<​15​> Friday 15. I put up a sign “” in consequence of my house being constantly crowded with strangers and other persons wishing to see me, or had business in the ; I found myself unable to support so much company free of charge, which I have done from the foundation of the church; my house has been a home and resting place for thousands, and my family many times obliged to do without food, after having fed all they had to visitors; and I could have continued the same liberal course, had it not been for the cruel and untiring persecution of my relentless enemies. I have been reduced to the necessity of opening my mansion as a hotel, have provided the best Table accommodations in the , and the being large and convenient, renders travellers more comfortable than any other place on the Upper . I have erected a large and commodious brick stable, and it is capable of accommodating [p. 1734]
September 13 regard to that place and people is very erroneous. During his residence there he became quite familiar with their manners, principles and habits, and says there is not a more industrious, moral and well ordered town in the country. Society is as much diversified there as it is here, the Mormons constituting about two thirds of he population, while all religious sects are as freely tolerated as in any other part of the . He was at the late trial and acquital of Joseph Smith, and says that the charges against him were of the most frivolous and unsubstantial nature. He is an agreeable man in conversation, is respected by those who know him and is ‘as much sinned against as sinning’. He only claims the privilege of exercising and enjoying his own religion— a privilege which he and his followers cheerfully award to others. They invite immigrants to come among them, and receive those who design to enter into the Mormon community with great attention and kindness. Houses are prepared for their reception, to which they are conducted on their arrival, by a Committee appointed for that purpose, whose next business it is to attend to their immediate wants and see them comfortably situated. Education is by no means neglected— proper schools and teachers being provided; and temperance reigns throughout. It has now about 15 to 18.000 inhabitants and promises to become a place of extensive business, four or five steamboats stopping there every day. [HC 6:32] The gentleman remarked to us that he wished he could speak as well of his own native town as he could of . This is news to us, as no doubt it will be to many, but no one who knows him can doubt the integrity of our informant.”
14 September 1843 • Thursday
14 Thursday 14. I attended a second lecture on Socialism by Mr Finch; and after he got through, I made a few remarks alluding to and getting up a community at , and of the big fish there eating up all the little fish. I said I did not believe the doctrine. Mr Finch replied a few minutes, and said “I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness— I am the Spiritual prophet— Mr. Smith the temporal.”
Elder replied to the lecture at some length.
15 September 1843 • Friday
15 Friday 15. I put up a sign “” in consequence of my house being constantly crowded with strangers and other persons wishing to see me, or had business in the ; I found myself unable to support so much company free of charge, which I have done from the foundation of the church; my house has been a home and resting place for thousands, and my family many times obliged to do without food, after having fed all they had to visitors; and I could have continued the same liberal course, had it not been for the cruel and untiring persecution of my relentless enemies. I have been reduced to the necessity of opening my mansion as a hotel, have provided the best Table accommodations in the , and the being large and convenient, renders travellers more comfortable than any other place on the Upper . I have erected a large and commodious brick stable, and it is capable of accommodating [p. 1734]
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