History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1661
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<​4​> Thus it has been with us. said if the people would elect him he would exterminate the Mormons, and take away their charters. As to he made no such threats, but manifested a spirit in his speeches to give every man his rights; hence the church universally voted for , and he was elected Governor. But he has issued writs against me the first time the Missourians made a demand for me, and this is the second one he has issued for me, which has caused me much trouble and expense.
Prest. Smith also rehearsed the account of his being taken by and , and the unlawful treatment he received at their hands.
The multitude gave good attention and much prejudice seemed to be removed.”
Three Steamers arrived in the afternoon, one from , one from , and one from , bringing from 800 to 1000 Ladies and Gentlemen on the arrival of each Boat, the people were escorted by the Nauvoo band, to convenient seats provided for them and were welcomed by the firing of cannon which brought to our minds the last words of the Patriot Jefferson “Let this day be celebrated by the firing of cannon &c”. the visitors and saints appeared to be highly gratified. [HC 5:490]
[blank] A collection was taken in the morning to assist Elder to build his house, and in the afternoon on his own responsibility, proposed a collection to assist me in bearing the expences of my persecution.
The meeting closed about 7 pm. The day was pleasant, sky clear and nothing tended to disturb the peace.
I extract from the Quincy Whig.
“I left on the glorious fourth on board the splendid steamer Annawan, Captain Whitney, in company with a large number of ladies and gentlemen of this city, on a pleasure excursion to the far-famed city of . The kindness of the officers of the boat, and the hearty welcome received from the citizens of on our arrival there, induced me to return to each and all of them my own, and the thanks of every passenger on board the Annawan— as I am sure all alike feel grateful for the pleasure they experienced. We left at half-past eight, and reached at about two o’clock, p, m, where we received an invitation from the prophet to attend the delivering of an oration, which was accepted and two companies of the Legion were sent to escort us to the (on the hill near the ) where the oration was to be delivered. When we reached the brow of the hill, we received a salute from the artillery there stationed, and proceeded on to the , where we were welcomed in a cordial and happy manner by the prophet, and his people. The large concourse of people assembled to celebrate the day which gave birth to American Independence, convinced me that the Mormons have been most grossly slandered; and that they respect, cherish, and love the free institutions of our , and appreciate the sacrifices and blood shed of those patriots who established them. I never saw a more orderly, gentlemanly, and hospitable people than the Mormons, nor a more enterprising population, as the stirring appearance of their city indicates. is destined to be— under the influence and enterprize of such citizens as it now contains, and her natural advantages— a populous, wealthy and manufacturing city.
The services of the day were opened by a chaste and appropriate prayer, [p. 1661]
4 Thus it has been with us. said if the people would elect him he would exterminate the Mormons, and take away their charters. As to he made no such threats, but manifested a spirit in his speeches to give every man his rights; hence the church universally voted for , and he was elected Governor. But he has issued writs against me the first time the Missourians made a demand for me, and this is the second one he has issued for me, which has caused me much trouble and expense.
Prest. Smith also rehearsed the account of his being taken by and , and the unlawful treatment he received at their hands.
The multitude gave good attention and much prejudice seemed to be removed.”
Three Steamers arrived in the afternoon, one from , one from , and one from , bringing from 800 to 1000 Ladies and Gentlemen on the arrival of each Boat, the people were escorted by the Nauvoo band, to convenient seats provided for them and were welcomed by the firing of cannon which brought to our minds the last words of the Patriot Jefferson “Let this day be celebrated by the firing of cannon &c”. the visitors and saints appeared to be highly gratified. [HC 5:490]
[blank] A collection was taken in the morning to assist Elder to build his house, and in the afternoon on his own responsibility, proposed a collection to assist me in bearing the expences of my persecution.
The meeting closed about 7 pm. The day was pleasant, sky clear and nothing tended to disturb the peace.
I extract from the Quincy Whig.
“I left on the glorious fourth on board the splendid steamer Annawan, Captain Whitney, in company with a large number of ladies and gentlemen of this city, on a pleasure excursion to the far-famed city of . The kindness of the officers of the boat, and the hearty welcome received from the citizens of on our arrival there, induced me to return to each and all of them my own, and the thanks of every passenger on board the Annawan— as I am sure all alike feel grateful for the pleasure they experienced. We left at half-past eight, and reached at about two o’clock, p, m, where we received an invitation from the prophet to attend the delivering of an oration, which was accepted and two companies of the Legion were sent to escort us to the (on the hill near the ) where the oration was to be delivered. When we reached the brow of the hill, we received a salute from the artillery there stationed, and proceeded on to the , where we were welcomed in a cordial and happy manner by the prophet, and his people. The large concourse of people assembled to celebrate the day which gave birth to American Independence, convinced me that the Mormons have been most grossly slandered; and that they respect, cherish, and love the free institutions of our , and appreciate the sacrifices and blood shed of those patriots who established them. I never saw a more orderly, gentlemanly, and hospitable people than the Mormons, nor a more enterprising population, as the stirring appearance of their city indicates. is destined to be— under the influence and enterprize of such citizens as it now contains, and her natural advantages— a populous, wealthy and manufacturing city.
The services of the day were opened by a chaste and appropriate prayer, [p. 1661]
Page 1661