History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 147
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<June 22> I had a consultation for a little while with my brother , , , and , and determined to go to , and lay the matter before .
About 7 P. M. I requested and to stand guard at the , and not to admit any stranger inside the house. (.)
At sundown, I asked if he would go with me a short journey, and he replied he would. (.) -[See Margin.]-
<Abraham C. Hodge says that soon after dark Joseph called A. C. Hodge, , , , and some others into his <upper> room and said “brethren, here is a letter from the which I wish to have read”. After it was read through Joseph remarked “there is no mercy— no mercy here”. said “No; just as sure as we fall into their hands we are dead men”. Joseph replied “yes; what shall we do brother ?” He replied, “I don’t know”. All at once Joseph’s countenance brightened up and he said, “the way is open— it is clear to my mind what to do; all they want is and myself— then tell every body to go about their business, and not to collect in groups but scatter about; there is no doubt they will come here and search for us— let them search; they will not harm you in person or property, & not even a hair of your head. We will cross the tonight and [HC 6:545] go away <to the West>. He made a move to go out of the house to cross the ; when out of doors he told and Hodge to take the Maid of Iowa (in charge of Repsher) get it to the Upper landing, and put his and ’s families and effects upon her; then to go down the , and up the Ohio river to Portsmouth where they should hear from them. He then took Hodge by the hand and said, “now, bror Hodge, let what will come, don’t deny the faith, and all will be well”.>
I told that if I and were ever taken again, we should be massacred, or I was not a prophet of God; “I want to live to avenge my blood, b<ut> he is determined not to leave me.” [HC 6:546]
 
Account of Arrest, Imprisonment, and Martyrdom, 22–29 June 1844
An account of the arrest, imprisonment, and martyrdom of President Joseph Smith, and Patriarch in Jail, Hancock County, Illinois, as collected from the journals kept at the time by Dr. , and the statements published by , Messrs Reid and , and , and the writings and statements of , , , and many other persons who were personally acquainted with the transactions.
By the Historian
 
About 9 P. M, came out of the and gave his hand to , at the same time saying, “a company of men are seeking to kill my brother Joseph, and the Lord has warned him to flee to the Rocky Mountains to save his life; good bye , we shall see you again.” In a few minutes afterwards, Joseph came from his family; his tears were flowing fast; he held a handkerchief to his face, and followed after brother without uttering a word. (.)
Between 9 & 10 P. M., Joseph, and , while waiting on the banks of the for the skiff, sent [HC 6:547] for , and instructed him to take their families to by the second Steamboat arriving at , and when he arrived there to commence petitioning the of the and Congress for redress of grievances, and see if they would grant the Church liberty and equal rights. Joseph then said “go to our wives, and tell them what we have concluded to do, and learn their feelings on the subject; and tell you will be ready to start by the second Steamboat, and she has sufficient money wherewith to pay the expenses. If you ascertain by tomorrow morning that there is any thing wrong, come over the to to the house of Captain , and there you will learn where we are. (.)
About midnight Joseph, , and called for at his lodgings, and all went up the river bank until they found ’s boat, which they got into, and started about 2 A.M. to cross the . rowed the skiff which was very leaky, so that it kept Joseph, , and the busy baling out the water with their boots and shoes to prevent it from sinking. (.)
23 June 1844 • Sunday • First of Two Entries
<23> Sunday 23. At daybreak arrived on the side of the river. Sent back to with instructions to return the next night with Horses for Joseph and , pass them over the in the night secretly, and to be ready to start for the Great Basin in the . (.)
Joseph, , and walked up to Captain ’s house, where they arrived at sunrise, but he not being at home, they went from thence to brother William Jordan’s. About 9 A. M. came over the to visit Joseph. Also [p. 147]
June 22 I had a consultation for a little while with my brother , , , and , and determined to go to , and lay the matter before .
About 7 P. M. I requested and to stand guard at the , and not to admit any stranger inside the house. (.)
At sundown, I asked if he would go with me a short journey, and he replied he would. (.) -[See Margin.]-
Abraham C. Hodge says that soon after dark Joseph called A. C. Hodge, , , , and some others into his upper room and said “brethren, here is a letter from the which I wish to have read”. After it was read through Joseph remarked “there is no mercy— no mercy here”. said “No; just as sure as we fall into their hands we are dead men”. Joseph replied “yes; what shall we do brother ?” He replied, “I don’t know”. All at once Joseph’s countenance brightened up and he said, “the way is open— it is clear to my mind what to do; all they want is and myself— then tell every body to go about their business, and not to collect in groups but scatter about; there is no doubt they will come here and search for us— let them search; they will not harm you in person or property, & not even a hair of your head. We will cross the tonight and [HC 6:545] go away to the West. He made a move to go out of the house to cross the ; when out of doors he told and Hodge to take the Maid of Iowa (in charge of Repsher) get it to the Upper landing, and put his and ’s families and effects upon her; then to go down the , and up the Ohio river to Portsmouth where they should hear from them. He then took Hodge by the hand and said, “now, bror Hodge, let what will come, don’t deny the faith, and all will be well”.
I told that if I and were ever taken again, we should be massacred, or I was not a prophet of God; “I want to live to avenge my blood, but he is determined not to leave me.” [HC 6:546]
 
Account of Arrest, Imprisonment, and Martyrdom, 22–29 June 1844
An account of the arrest, imprisonment, and martyrdom of President Joseph Smith, and Patriarch in Jail, Hancock County, Illinois, as collected from the journals kept at the time by Dr. , and the statements published by , Messrs Reid and , and , and the writings and statements of , , , and many other persons who were personally acquainted with the transactions.
By the Historian
 
About 9 P. M, came out of the and gave his hand to , at the same time saying, “a company of men are seeking to kill my brother Joseph, and the Lord has warned him to flee to the Rocky Mountains to save his life; good bye , we shall see you again.” In a few minutes afterwards, Joseph came from his family; his tears were flowing fast; he held a handkerchief to his face, and followed after brother without uttering a word. (.)
Between 9 & 10 P. M., Joseph, and , while waiting on the banks of the for the skiff, sent [HC 6:547] for , and instructed him to take their families to by the second Steamboat arriving at , and when he arrived there to commence petitioning the of the and Congress for redress of grievances, and see if they would grant the Church liberty and equal rights. Joseph then said “go to our wives, and tell them what we have concluded to do, and learn their feelings on the subject; and tell you will be ready to start by the second Steamboat, and she has sufficient money wherewith to pay the expenses. If you ascertain by tomorrow morning that there is any thing wrong, come over the to to the house of Captain , and there you will learn where we are. (.)
About midnight Joseph, , and called for at his lodgings, and all went up the river bank until they found ’s boat, which they got into, and started about 2 A.M. to cross the . rowed the skiff which was very leaky, so that it kept Joseph, , and the busy baling out the water with their boots and shoes to prevent it from sinking. (.)
23 June 1844 • Sunday • First of Two Entries
23 Sunday 23. At daybreak arrived on the side of the river. Sent back to with instructions to return the next night with Horses for Joseph and , pass them over the in the night secretly, and to be ready to start for the Great Basin in the . (.)
Joseph, , and walked up to Captain ’s house, where they arrived at sunrise, but he not being at home, they went from thence to brother William Jordan’s. About 9 A. M. came over the to visit Joseph. Also [p. 147]
Page 147