History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 148
image
<June 23> , who made some explanations respecting ’s letter.
Early in the morning a posse arrived in to arrest Joseph; but as they did not find him they started back to immediately, leaving one man of the name of [Christopher] Yates behind them, who said to one of the brethren, that designed that if Joseph and were not given up he would send his troops and guard the until they were found, if it took three years to do it.
About 11 A. M., sent over , and to intreat of Joseph and to come back to and give themselves up for trial, and to inform them what the intended to do in case they did not deliver themselves up. (.)
says that about noon, he went to the house of Captain as proposed by Joseph the night before. In a short time afterwards came in when they went to the house of William Jordan, where Joseph, , and were, And he told them that refused to go, but that ’s wife, and the ’s agreed to follow counsel. Directly afterwards and came in, and commenced interceding with for them to come back to , And stuck to it until he persuaded them to do so. (.)
<they went to Mills’ Tavern; and the Officer in command exhorted and to have Joseph and come back, as the safety of depended on it. He pledged himself that their lives should be protected. was satisfied with this pledge and said it could be depended upon, as he was an old acquaintance of his; and agreed to use his influence to fetch them back. They went and informed , who requested them to go to Joseph and and say that unless they returned and went to , would be burnt up and the people massacred.>
<About 11 A. M., the posse had mounted their animals to return to , when laid his hand on ’s shoulder and said, “there must be something done in this matter immediately, or our property in the will be of no value whatever <and a number of men will be ruined if Joseph leaves.> then called the officer aside, and promised if he would wait until 2 P. M. they would go over the and try to persuade Joseph and to come back. Upon that promise, the posse dismounted and the animals were ordered back to the stable.>
<About this time L[yman] O. Littlefield came from the in great agitation and said to , “something must be done— we must get those men back or we shall all be destroyed. I must have some help immediately to pack away the printing press and fixtures.”>
At 1 P. M, sent over , requesting him to intreat of Joseph to come back; accompanied him with a letter which had written to the same effect, and she insisted that should persuade Joseph to come back and give himself up. When they went over they found Joseph, , and in a room by themselves, having flour and other provisions on the floor ready for packing. (.)
informed Joseph what the troops intended to do, and urged upon him to give himself up, inasmuch as the had pledged his faith and the faith of the to protect him while he underwent a legal and fair trial. , , and accused Joseph of cowardice for wishing to leave the people, adding that their property would be destroyed and they left without house or home; that when <like the fable when> the wolves came, the shepherd ran from the flock, and left the sheep to be devoured. To which Joseph replied, “if my life is of no value to my friends it is of none to myself”.
Joseph said to “what shall I do?” replied, “you are the oldest and ought to know best; and as you make your bed I will lay with you”. Joseph then turned to who was talking with , and said, “brother , you are the oldest, what shall we do?” said, “let us go back and give ourselves up, and see the thing out.” After studying a few moments Joseph said, “if you go back I shall go with you, but we shall be butchered”. said, “no, no; let us go back, and put our trust in God, and we shall not be harmed; the Lord is in it; if we live or have to die we will be reconciled to our fate”. (.)
After a short pause Joseph told to request Captain Daniel C. Davis to have his boat ready by half past five o’clock, to cross them over the . (.)
Joseph and then wrote the following letter:
“Bank of the River ,
Sunday, June 23rd, 1844. 2 P. M.
“His Excellency ,
Sir,
I wrote you a long communication at 12 last night expressive of my views of your ’s communication of yesterday. I thought your letter rather severe, but one of my friends has just come to me with an explanation from the Captain of your posse, which softened the subject matter of your communication, and gives us greater assurances of protection, and that your has succeeded in bringing in subjection the spirits [p. 148]
June 23 , who made some explanations respecting ’s letter.
At 1 P. M, sent over , requesting him to intreat of Joseph to come back; accompanied him with a letter which had written to the same effect, and she insisted that should persuade Joseph to come back and give himself up. When they went over they found Joseph, , and in a room by themselves, having flour and other provisions on the floor ready for packing. (.)
informed Joseph what the troops intended to do, and urged upon him to give himself up, inasmuch as the had pledged his faith and the faith of the to protect him while he underwent a legal and fair trial. , , and accused Joseph of cowardice for wishing to leave the people, adding that their property would be destroyed and they left without house or home; like the fable when the wolves came, the shepherd ran from the flock, and left the sheep to be devoured. To which Joseph replied, “if my life is of no value to my friends it is of none to myself”.
Joseph said to “what shall I do?” replied, “you are the oldest and ought to know best; and as you make your bed I will lay with you”. Joseph then turned to who was talking with , and said, “brother , you are the oldest, what shall we do?” said, “let us go back and give ourselves up, and see the thing out.” After studying a few moments Joseph said, “if you go back I shall go with you, but we shall be butchered”. said, “no, no; let us go back, and put our trust in God, and we shall not be harmed; the Lord is in it; if we live or have to die we will be reconciled to our fate”. (.)
After a short pause Joseph told to request Captain Daniel C. Davis to have his boat ready by half past five o’clock, to cross them over the . (.)
Joseph and then wrote the following letter:
“Bank of the River ,
Sunday, June 23rd, 1844. 2 P. M.
“His Excellency ,
Sir,
I wrote you a long communication at 12 last night expressive of my views of your ’s communication of yesterday. I thought your letter rather severe, but one of my friends has just come to me with an explanation from the Captain of your posse, which softened the subject matter of your communication, and gives us greater assurances of protection, and that your has succeeded in bringing in subjection the spirits [p. 148]
Page 148