History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 149
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<​June 23​> which surround your to some extent. And I declare again, the only objection I ever had or ever made to <​a​> trial by my country at any time, was what I have made in my last letter.— on account of assassins, and the reason I have to fear deathly consequences from their hands. But from the explanation, I now offer to come to you at on the morrow, as early as shall be convenient for your posse to escort us in to Head Quarters, provided we can have a fair trial, not be abused, nor have my witnesses abused, and have all things done in due form of law, without partiality, and you may depend on my honor without the show of a great armed force to produce excitement in the minds of the timid. We will meet your posse, if this letter is satisfactory (if not inform me) at or near the Mound at or about two o’clock tomorrow afternoon, which will be as soon as we can get our witnesses, and prepare for trial. We shall expect to take our witnesses with us, and not have to wait a subpoena, or a part at least, so as not to detain the proceedings, although we may want time for counsel.
“We remain most respectfully, Your ’s Humble Servants,
Joseph Smith,
.” [HC 6:550]
Also wrote to Esq.:
“Sunday, , June 23rd, 1844.
Esq.,
Sir:— I have agreed to meet at tomorrow to attend an examination before , and request your attendance, professionally with the best attorney you can bring.
“I meet the ’s Posse on the Mound at 10. A. M.; in at 12 noon. Do not fail me and oblige,
yours respectfully,
Joseph Smith
per , Clerk.
“P. S. Dr. I wish as witness &c.”
And also to Dr. as follows:—
, Sunday, June 23rd, 1844.
“Dr. ,
Sir:— I would respectfully solicit our attendance at Court in tomorrow at 12 noon as witness in Case ‘State of , on complaint of vs Joseph Smith and others.’ Dear Sir, do not fail me and oblige your old friend,
Joseph Smith
<​by​> , Clerk.
“P. S. and co-partner are expected; we meet the ’s Posse on the Mound at 10 A. M.; at at 12 noon; bearer will give particulars.”
About four o’clock P. M., Joseph, , the , and others started back; while walking towards the Joseph fell behind with ; the others shouted to him to come on; Joseph replied, “it is of no use to hurry, for we are going back to be slaughtered”, and continually expressed himself that he would like to get the people once more together, and talk to them tonight. said if that was his wish he would get the people together, and he could talk to them by starlight. (.) [HC 6:551]
It was through the strong persuasions of , , and , who were carrying out ’s instructions, that induced Joseph and to start back to . They recrossed the at half past five; when they arrived <​at his ​> in , Joseph’s family surrounded him and he went to the with them without molestation, and <​he​> tarried there all night, giving up the idea of preaching to the saints by starlight.
He sent the letter to of this date by Col. . *
<​* And Elder , who carried it to , where they arrived about 9 p. m. They gave the letter to , who first agreed to send a posse to escort Gen. Smith in safety to ; immediately afterwards came in and made a very bitter speech to the , in which and joined, telling him naught but lies, which caused to ask if Messengers to him were to be insulted in that manner. The treated them coldly, and recinded his previous promise and refused to send, or allow an escort to go with Joseph, as he said it was an honor not given to any other citizen. He— would not allow the Messengers to stay in through the night, but ordered them to start at 10 o’clock and return to with orders for Gen. Smith to be in by 10 o’clock tomorrow morning without an escort; and he threatened that if Gen. Smith did not give himself up at that time, that would be destroyed, and all the men, women and children that were in it. Messrs. and immediately started, but on account of their horses being wearied they did not arrive in until about 4 a. m. of the 24th. when they went to Gen. Smith to report to him the state of excitement in : he would not hear one word of the warning, as he was determined to go to and give himself up to the .​> [HC 6:552]
<​About sundown, <​Genl.​> went to <​Capt.​> ’s house, near the Lone Trees, and told him that Joseph requested him () to go over to , and procure two horses and some clothing &c, and take them across the river the next night to his house​> [p. 149]
June 23 which surround your to some extent. And I declare again, the only objection I ever had or ever made to a trial by my country at any time, was what I have made in my last letter.— on account of assassins, and the reason I have to fear deathly consequences from their hands. But from the explanation, I now offer to come to you at on the morrow, as early as shall be convenient for your posse to escort us in to Head Quarters, provided we can have a fair trial, not be abused, nor have my witnesses abused, and have all things done in due form of law, without partiality, and you may depend on my honor without the show of a great armed force to produce excitement in the minds of the timid. We will meet your posse, if this letter is satisfactory (if not inform me) at or near the Mound at or about two o’clock tomorrow afternoon, which will be as soon as we can get our witnesses, and prepare for trial. We shall expect to take our witnesses with us, and not have to wait a subpoena, or a part at least, so as not to detain the proceedings, although we may want time for counsel.
“We remain most respectfully, Your ’s Humble Servants,
Joseph Smith,
.” [HC 6:550]
Also wrote to Esq.:
“Sunday, , June 23rd, 1844.
Esq.,
Sir:— I have agreed to meet at tomorrow to attend an examination before , and request your attendance, professionally with the best attorney you can bring.
“I meet the ’s Posse on the Mound at 10. A. M.; in at 12 noon. Do not fail me and oblige,
yours respectfully,
Joseph Smith
per , Clerk.
“P. S. Dr. I wish as witness &c.”
And also to Dr. as follows:—
, Sunday, June 23rd, 1844.
“Dr. ,
Sir:— I would respectfully solicit our attendance at Court in tomorrow at 12 noon as witness in Case ‘State of , on complaint of vs Joseph Smith and others.’ Dear Sir, do not fail me and oblige your old friend,
Joseph Smith
by , Clerk.
“P. S. and co-partner are expected; we meet the ’s Posse on the Mound at 10 A. M.; at at 12 noon; bearer will give particulars.”
About four o’clock P. M., Joseph, , the , and others started back; while walking towards the Joseph fell behind with ; the others shouted to him to come on; Joseph replied, “it is of no use to hurry, for we are going back to be slaughtered”, and continually expressed himself that he would like to get the people once more together, and talk to them tonight. said if that was his wish he would get the people together, and he could talk to them by starlight. (.) [HC 6:551]
It was through the strong persuasions of , , and , who were carrying out ’s instructions, that induced Joseph and to start back to . They recrossed the at half past five; when they arrived at his in , Joseph’s family surrounded him , and he tarried there all night, giving up the idea of preaching to the saints by starlight.
He sent the letter to of this date by Col. . *
* And Elder , who carried it to , where they arrived about 9 p. m. They gave the letter to , who first agreed to send a posse to escort Gen. Smith in safety to ; immediately afterwards came in and made a very bitter speech to the , in which and joined, telling him naught but lies, which caused to ask if Messengers to him were to be insulted in that manner. The treated them coldly, and recinded his previous promise and refused to send, or allow an escort to go with Joseph, as he said it was an honor not given to any other citizen. He— would not allow the Messengers to stay in through the night, but ordered them to start at 10 o’clock and return to with orders for Gen. Smith to be in by 10 o’clock tomorrow morning without an escort; and he threatened that if Gen. Smith did not give himself up at that time, that would be destroyed, and all the men, women and children that were in it. Messrs. and immediately started, but on account of their horses being wearied they did not arrive in until about 4 a. m. of the 24th. when they went to Gen. Smith to report to him the state of excitement in : he would not hear one word of the warning, as he was determined to go to and give himself up to the . [HC 6:552]
[p. 149]
Page 149