History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 151
image
24 June 1844 • Monday • First of Two Entries
<June 24> Monday. 24. having sworn out a writ before  , a Justice of the Peace at , on the 11th. inst against  Joseph Smith, , , , ,  , , , , , , , ,  , , , ,  and , for riot in destroying the Nauvoo Expositor Press, the property   and and others on the 10th inst.; and  having sent word by the Posse that those eighteen persons should be protected by  the Militia of the ; they, upon the assurance of that pledge at 6½ A. M. started  for , , , , Alfred Randall,  James Davis, , A[braham] C. Hodge, and several other brethren, together  with , as Counsel, accompanying them.
When they arrived at the top of the hill, Joseph sent with  a horse for Dr Southwick, a southern gentleman who had been staying some  days at the , and who wished General Joseph Smith to buy considerable  property in ; but took possession of the horse, so that Dr. S.  could not then go. -[]-
Joseph paused when they got to the , and looked with  admiration first on that, and then on the , and remarked “this is the  loveliest place and the best people under the heavens; little do they know the  trials that await them.” As he passed out of the he called on Esq., who was unwell, and on parting he said “, I wish  you to cherish my memory, and not think me the worst man in the world either”. <-[]]->
At 10 min to 10 a. m., they arrived at Albert G. Fellows’ farm, 4 miles  west of , where they met , with a company of about  sixty mounted militia, on seeing which Joseph said “do not be alarmed brethren,  for they cannot do more to you than the enemies of truth did to the ancient  saints— they can only kill the body.” The company made a halt, when Joseph, , and several others went into Fellows’ house with , who  presented an order from for all the “State Arms” in possession  of the Nauvoo Legion, which Joseph immediately countersigned.
went up to Joseph and said “Brother Joseph  shall I return to , and regulate about getting the arms, and get the  receipts for them?” Joseph inquired if he was under arrest, or expected to be  arrested. answered “No”; when Joseph directed him to return a-head  of the company, gather the arms, and do as well as he could in all things.  Joseph then said to the company who were with him, “I am going like a lamb  to the slaughter, but I am calm as a summer’s morning; I have a conscience  void of offence toward God, and toward all men; if they take my life I shall  die an innocent man, and my blood shall cry from the ground for vengeance,  and it shall yet be said of me ‘he was murdered in cold blood’.” He then  said to , “Go and God bless you.” then rode as  swiftly as he could to . -[]-
left the company there, and continued his journey to .
This order for the delivery of the State arms was evidently designed  to drive the Citizens of to desperation, so that in the heat of their indignation [p. 151]
24 June 1844 • Monday • First of Two Entries
June 24 Monday. 24. having sworn out a writ before , a Justice of the Peace at , on the 11th. inst against Joseph Smith, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , and , for riot in destroying the Nauvoo Expositor Press, the property and and others on the 10th inst.; and having sent word by the Posse that those eighteen persons should be protected by the Militia of the ; they, upon the assurance of that pledge at 6½ A. M. started for , , , , Alfred Randall, James Davis, , Abraham C. Hodge, and several other brethren, together with , as Counsel, accompanying them.
When they arrived at the top of the hill, Joseph sent with a horse for Dr Southwick, a southern gentleman who had been staying some days at the , and who wished General Joseph Smith to buy considerable property in ; but took possession of the horse, so that Dr. S. could not then go. -[]-
Joseph paused when they got to the , and looked with admiration first on that, and then on the , and remarked “this is the loveliest place and the best people under the heavens; little do they know the trials that await them.” As he passed out of the he called on Esq., who was unwell, and on parting he said “, I wish you to cherish my memory, and not think me the worst man in the world either”. -[]]-
At 10 min to 10 a. m., they arrived at Albert G. Fellows’ farm, 4 miles west of , where they met , with a company of about sixty mounted militia, on seeing which Joseph said “do not be alarmed brethren, for they cannot do more to you than the enemies of truth did to the ancient saints— they can only kill the body.” The company made a halt, when Joseph, , and several others went into Fellows’ house with , who presented an order from for all the “State Arms” in possession of the Nauvoo Legion, which Joseph immediately countersigned.
went up to Joseph and said “Brother Joseph shall I return to , and regulate about getting the arms, and get the receipts for them?” Joseph inquired if he was under arrest, or expected to be arrested. answered “No”; when Joseph directed him to return a-head of the company, gather the arms, and do as well as he could in all things. Joseph then said to the company who were with him, “I am going like a lamb to the slaughter, but I am calm as a summer’s morning; I have a conscience void of offence toward God, and toward all men; if they take my life I shall die an innocent man, and my blood shall cry from the ground for vengeance, and it shall yet be said of me ‘he was murdered in cold blood’.” He then said to , “Go and God bless you.” then rode as swiftly as he could to . -[]-
left the company there, and continued his journey to .
This order for the delivery of the State arms was evidently designed to drive the Citizens of to desperation, so that in the heat of their indignation [p. 151]
Page 151