History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 186
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<​June 27​> every thing waste about ; they therefore carried it to Arza Adams who was sick with the ague and fever, bout 2½ miles North of ; he was afraid to go on the main road, and after two hours persuasion Mr Benjamin Leyland consented to pilot Adams by “a blind road”, and about midnight they started and arrived in a little after sunrise; they found the News had arrived before them for about a dozen men were chatting about it at the , not knowing what to believe until Adams handed in the <​above​> official letter. [HC 6:622]
In the meantime the was making to the Saints in , one of the most infamous and insulting speeches that ever fell from the lips of an Executive; among other things he said,
“a great crime has been done by destroying the Expositor press and placing the under martial law, and a severe atonement must be made, so prepare your minds for the emergency. Another cause of excitement is the fact of your having so many fire arms; the public are afraid that you are going to use them against government. I know there is a great prejudice against you on account of your peculiar religion, but you ought to be praying saints, not military Saints, not military Saints. Depend upon it, a little more misbehavior from the citizens, and the torch which is now already lighted will be applied, the may be reduced to ashes and extermination would inevitably follow; and it gave one great pain to think that there was danger of so many innocent women and children being exterminated. If anything of a serious character should befal the lives or poperty of the persons who are prosecuting your leaders, you will be held responsible”
The was solicited to stay until morning, but he declined and left at about 6½ P. M.; and in passing up Main Street his escort performed the sword exercise, giving all the passes, guards, cuts and thrusts, taking up the entire width of [HC 6:623] the street, and making as imposing a show as they could, until they passed ’s store near the ; this was apparently done to intimidate the people, as the had remarked in his speech, that they need not expect to set themselves up against such “well disciplined troops.”
Soon after Capt. Singleton and his company left for home.
When the and his party had proceeded about three miles <​from ​> they met two messengers ( and ) hastening with the sad news to ; the took them back to with him, <​to ’s house 1½ miles east of ​> and kept them in custody in order to prevent their carrying the News until he and the authorities had removed the County records and public documents, and until most of the inhabitants had left . The then proceeded towards , <​when took another horse and rode into with the news that night.​>
12 o’clock at night, 27th June,
, .
“To Mrs , and &c,—
The has just arrived; says all things shall be inquired into, and all right measures taken.
“I say to all the citizens of , my brethren, be still, and know that God reigns. Don’t rush out of the city— don’t rush to : stay at home, and be prepared for an attack from Missouri mobbers. The will render every assistance [p. 186]
June 27 every thing waste about ; they therefore carried it to Arza Adams who was sick with the ague and fever, bout 2½ miles North of ; he was afraid to go on the main road, and after two hours persuasion Mr Benjamin Leyland consented to pilot Adams by “a blind road”, and about midnight they started and arrived in a little after sunrise; they found the News had arrived before them for about a dozen men were chatting about it at the , not knowing what to believe until Adams handed in the above official letter. [HC 6:622]
In the meantime the was making to the Saints in , one of the most infamous and insulting speeches that ever fell from the lips of an Executive; among other things he said,
“a great crime has been done by destroying the Expositor press and placing the under martial law, and a severe atonement must be made, so prepare your minds for the emergency. Another cause of excitement is the fact of your having so many fire arms; the public are afraid that you are going to use them against government. I know there is a great prejudice against you on account of your peculiar religion, but you ought to be praying saints, not military Saints, Depend upon it, a little more misbehavior from the citizens, and the torch which is now already lighted will be applied, the may be reduced to ashes and extermination would inevitably follow; and it gave one great pain to think that there was danger of so many innocent women and children being exterminated. If anything of a serious character should befal the lives or poperty of the persons who are prosecuting your leaders, you will be held responsible”
The was solicited to stay until morning, but he declined and left at about 6½ P. M.; and in passing up Main Street his escort performed the sword exercise, giving all the passes, guards, cuts and thrusts, taking up the entire width of [HC 6:623] the street, and making as imposing a show as they could, until they passed ’s store near the ; this was apparently done to intimidate the people, as the had remarked in his speech, that they need not expect to set themselves up against such “well disciplined troops.”
Soon after Capt. Singleton and his company left for home.
When the and his party had proceeded about three miles from they met two messengers ( and ) hastening with the sad news to ; the took them back with him, to ’s house 1½ miles east of in order to prevent their carrying the News until he and the authorities had removed the County records and public documents, and until most of the inhabitants had left . The then proceeded towards , when took another horse and rode into with the news that night.
12 o’clock at night, 27th June,
, .
“To Mrs , and &c,—
The has just arrived; says all things shall be inquired into, and all right measures taken.
“I say to all the citizens of , my brethren, be still, and know that God reigns. Don’t rush out of the city— don’t rush to : stay at home, and be prepared for an attack from Missouri mobbers. The will render every assistance [p. 186]
Page 186