History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 233
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<June 29> have 2000 copies of your views on the powers and policy of the government printed, and for the Elders to scatter them with the velocity of lightning and the voice of thunder.
“I had nearly forgotten to mention an important occurrence on board of the ‘Louis Phillippe, with a Mr David Guard of Lawrenceburgh Indiana: he is worth from 2 to $300,000; he emigrated to when there were but three log cabins in that place. He gave me his views on politics, which completely corresponded with yours: I then gave him two copies of your ‘Views’. He was highly pleased with them, and pledged his word he would have them published in both the Lawrenceburgh papers, as they were both published under his roof, and if they did not comply with so reasonable a request, they (the Editors) would have to seek shelter elsewhere. He also stated that Joseph Smith was the first man, since the days of [George] Washington and [Thomas] Jefferson, who had been frank and honest enough to give his views to the people before being elected; and said, that he would go his whole length for such a man, and that if you were not elected this time, you would <be> the next: let this be an ensample of numerous other cases, as you know it would be too irksome to write them all, or read them.
“To return to the subject, at ten o’clock this morning (the 27th) we left for with an addition of passengers. On this boat I was called upon to deliver an address showing the utility of the Book of Mormon, and the present situation of the world, which I did, and by this time we had a complete victory over both priests and people. On this boat a large majority of votes were given for yourself for President.
“We arrived at on the 30th at 6 p. m. Here we left President . Bros , and left on the 31st of May at 10 o’clock, from thence by steamer, stage and railway we passed over hills and dales, arriving at on the 2nd of June, preaching to, and thorning every body with politics that came in our way. Thus after a journey of thirteen days we arrived in the great Metropolis of the ; which by the bye, with the exception of the Pennsylvania Avenue, more resembles the Methodist slough of despond than anything like a decent city. At this time, being near the close of the session, it was filled up with demagogues, jack leg lawyers and black leg gamblers, and everything else but intelligence. The Senators and Representatives generally rise at 8 o’clock in the morning, prepare themselves for business about 11 o’clock, commonly return at 3 and 4 in the afternoon. From 6 till 9 is the only time we could do any business whatever, hence we prepared and watched our opportunity, and did all the [HC 7:137] business we could betwixt those hours, for ten days, pleading the cause of the poor and oppressed.
“We have got a petition signed, with our names attached, in behalf of the Church, asking for a remuneration for our losses, and not for our rights, or redress, for they would not receive such a petition from us. It was thought by Judge J[ames] Semple, , and Major Hughs, that our petition would carry if it was not too late in the session. [p. 233]
June 29 have 2000 copies of your views on the powers and policy of the government printed, and for the Elders to scatter them with the velocity of lightning and the voice of thunder.
“I had nearly forgotten to mention an important occurrence on board of the ‘Louis Phillippe, with a Mr David Guard of Lawrenceburgh Indiana: he is worth from 2 to $300,000; he emigrated to when there were but three log cabins in that place. He gave me his views on politics, which completely corresponded with yours: I then gave him two copies of your ‘Views’. He was highly pleased with them, and pledged his word he would have them published in both the Lawrenceburgh papers, as they were both published under his roof, and if they did not comply with so reasonable a request, they (the Editors) would have to seek shelter elsewhere. He also stated that Joseph Smith was the first man, since the days of George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, who had been frank and honest enough to give his views to the people before being elected; and said, that he would go his whole length for such a man, and that if you were not elected this time, you would be the next: let this be an ensample of numerous other cases, as you know it would be too irksome to write them all, or read them.
“To return to the subject, at ten o’clock this morning (the 27th) we left for with an addition of passengers. On this boat I was called upon to deliver an address showing the utility of the Book of Mormon, and the present situation of the world, which I did, and by this time we had a complete victory over both priests and people. On this boat a large majority of votes were given for yourself for President.
“We arrived at on the 30th at 6 p. m. Here we left President . Bros , and left on the 31st of May at 10 o’clock, from thence by steamer, stage and railway we passed over hills and dales, arriving at on the 2nd of June, preaching to, and thorning every body with politics that came in our way. Thus after a journey of thirteen days we arrived in the great Metropolis of the ; which by the bye, with the exception of the Pennsylvania Avenue, more resembles the Methodist slough of despond than anything like a decent city. At this time, being near the close of the session, it was filled up with demagogues, jack leg lawyers and black leg gamblers, and everything else but intelligence. The Senators and Representatives generally rise at 8 o’clock in the morning, prepare themselves for business about 11 o’clock, commonly return at 3 and 4 in the afternoon. From 6 till 9 is the only time we could do any business whatever, hence we prepared and watched our opportunity, and did all the [HC 7:137] business we could betwixt those hours, for ten days, pleading the cause of the poor and oppressed.
“We have got a petition signed, with our names attached, in behalf of the Church, asking for a remuneration for our losses, and not for our rights, or redress, for they would not receive such a petition from us. It was thought by Judge James Semple, , and Major Hughs, that our petition would carry if it was not too late in the session. [p. 233]
Page 233