History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 3 [addenda]
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<June 25> were to be subject to mob rule and to be dragged contrary to law,  into prison, at the instance of every infernal scoundrel whose oaths  could be bought for a dram of whiskey, his protection availed very  little, and we had miscalculated his promises.
Seeing there was no prospect of redress from the ,  I returned to the room and found the constable, , very urgent  to hurry Bros. Joseph and to prison whilst the brethren were  remonstrating with him. At the same time, a great rabble was gathered  in the streets and around the door, and from the rowdyism manifested  I was afraid there was a design to murder the prisoners on the way  to the jail. Without conferring with any person, my next feeling was  to procure a guard, and seeing a man habited as a soldier in the room  I went to him and said, ‘I am afraid there is a design against the  lives of the Messrs. Smith, will you go immediately and bring your  captain, and if not convenient any other captain of a company, and  I will pay you well for your trouble.’ He said he would, and departed  forthwith and soon returned with his captain, whose name I have  forgotten, and introduced him to me. I told him of my fears and  requested him immediately to fetch his company; he departed forthwith  and arrived at the door with them, just at the time that the  was hurrying the brethren downstairs. A number of the brethren went  along and one or two strangers, and all of us safely lodged in prison,  remained there during the night.” -[Page 160]-
Addenda • 26 June 1844
<June 26>
<Page 162> a lengthly conversation was entered into in relation to the existing  difficulties, and after some preliminary remarks, at the ’s request,  Bro. Joseph gave him a general outline of the state of affairs in relation  to our difficulties, the excited state of the country; the tumultuous, mob ocratic movements of our enemies; the precautionary measures used  by himself, (Joseph Smith) the acts of the City Council, the destruction  of the Press, and the moves of the mob, and ourselves up to that time.
The following report is by Elder :—
.— General Smith, I believe you have given me a  general outline of the difficulties that have existed in the country, in  the documents forwarded to me by and , but  unfortunately there seems to be a great discrepency betweeen your state ments and those of your enemies; it is true that you are substantiated  by evidence and affidavit, but for such an extraordinary excitement as  that which is now in the country, there must be some cause, and I  attribute the last outbreak to the destruction of the Expositor, and to your  refusal to comply with the writ issued by . The press in the   is looked upon as the great bulwark of American freedom,  and its destructon in was represented, and looked upon as a  high-handed measure, and manifests to the people a disposition on your  part, to suppress the liberty of speech and of the press; this, with your refusa[l]  to comply with the requisitions of a writ, I conceive to be the principal cause [p. 3 [addenda]]
June 25 were to be subject to mob rule and to be dragged contrary to law, into prison, at the instance of every infernal scoundrel whose oaths could be bought for a dram of whiskey, his protection availed very little, and we had miscalculated his promises.
Seeing there was no prospect of redress from the , I returned to the room and found the constable, , very urgent to hurry Bros. Joseph and to prison whilst the brethren were remonstrating with him. At the same time, a great rabble was gathered in the streets and around the door, and from the rowdyism manifested I was afraid there was a design to murder the prisoners on the way to the jail. Without conferring with any person, my next feeling was to procure a guard, and seeing a man habited as a soldier in the room I went to him and said, ‘I am afraid there is a design against the lives of the Messrs. Smith, will you go immediately and bring your captain, and if not convenient any other captain of a company, and I will pay you well for your trouble.’ He said he would, and departed forthwith and soon returned with his captain, whose name I have forgotten, and introduced him to me. I told him of my fears and requested him immediately to fetch his company; he departed forthwith and arrived at the door with them, just at the time that the was hurrying the brethren downstairs. A number of the brethren went along and one or two strangers, and all of us safely lodged in prison, remained there during the night.” -[Page 160]-
Addenda • 26 June 1844
June 26
Page 162 a lengthly conversation was entered into in relation to the existing difficulties, and after some preliminary remarks, at the ’s request, Bro. Joseph gave him a general outline of the state of affairs in relation to our difficulties, the excited state of the country; the tumultuous, mobocratic movements of our enemies; the precautionary measures used by himself, (Joseph Smith) the acts of the City Council, the destruction of the Press, and the moves of the mob, and ourselves up to that time.
The following report is by Elder :—
.— General Smith, I believe you have given me a general outline of the difficulties that have existed in the country, in the documents forwarded to me by and , but unfortunately there seems to be a great discrepency betweeen your statements and those of your enemies; it is true that you are substantiated by evidence and affidavit, but for such an extraordinary excitement as that which is now in the country, there must be some cause, and I attribute the last outbreak to the destruction of the Expositor, and to your refusal to comply with the writ issued by . The press in the is looked upon as the great bulwark of American freedom, and its destructon in was represented, and looked upon as a high-handed measure, and manifests to the people a disposition on your part, to suppress the liberty of speech and of the press; this, with your refusal to comply with the requisitions of a writ, I conceive to be the principal cause [p. 3 [addenda]]
Page 3 [addenda]