History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 290
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<​August 1​> laboring about six weeks, but continued preaching through the winter, strengthening the Churches and comforting the Saints. [HC 7:218]
“In a revelation given January 1832, and were called to go on a mission to the Eastern Country; accordingly they started in March, and travelled and preached the gospel through the States of , , , , Rhode Island, and : they baptised several in Spafford, N. Y., in and Lyne, Mass., in Providence, R. I., and in , Maine, <​preaching much from house to house, as well as in public congregations and​> returning to in November or December.
“During the year 1833 preached among the churches as he had opportunity, and spent a good portion of his time laboring with his hands. On the 17th of February 1834 he was ordained and set apart as one of the High Council in , in which office he officiated until he went to in 1838.
“August 13. 1834 he married , who was born in Bedford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Dec 20. 1808.
“Sept 16. 1835 he was appointed in company with as a committee and general agent to act in the name of, and for the . In the winter of 1835-6 he chopped cord wood for .
“In 1838 he travelled in company with his brother Joseph from to . He passed through the mobbing of that year, in and in , and his family suffered nigh unto death from exposure as they were driven about by the mob. He was in the battle, and immediately after, by the counsel of Prest , with bros. , B[enjamin] L. Clapp, and about twenty others they fled for by the wilderness through the North part of and the Southern part of . Messengers overtook them and informed them that had sent a company of fifty well armed men to follow them, with strict orders not to return until they had brought back the company either dead or alive. When this word came a halt was called, and asked what they should do in case the enemy overtook them; after a few moment’s consultation the whole company covenanted with uplifted hands to heaven, that if they were overtaken they would fight till they died, and not a man would fall into the hands of the enemy alive. They then travelled on ten miles and camped on the edge of some timber on the North side of a four mile prairie, and they afterwards learned that their enemies camped on the South edge of the same prairie, and would have overtaken them next day, had not the Lord sent a heavy snow storm during the night; and when the brethren arose in the morning, remarked, that that snow storm was their salvation. The air was so full of snow they could hardly find their [HC 7:219] horses to saddle them, but they soon mounted their horses and continued their journey as fast as they could. The storm was from the North and in their faces; it filled their tracks in a few moments so that ’s men could not follow. It was reported that this company of men on their return informed the that they could not overtake the [p. 290]
August 1 laboring about six weeks, but continued preaching through the winter, strengthening the Churches and comforting the Saints. [HC 7:218]
“In a revelation given January 1832, and were called to go on a mission to the Eastern Country; accordingly they started in March, and travelled and preached the gospel through the States of , , , , Rhode Island, and : they baptised several in Spafford, N. Y., in and Lyne, Mass., in Providence, R. I., and in , Maine, preaching much from house to house, as well as in public congregations and returning to in November or December.
“During the year 1833 preached among the churches as he had opportunity, and spent a good portion of his time laboring with his hands. On the 17th of February 1834 he was ordained and set apart as one of the High Council in , in which office he officiated until he went to in 1838.
“August 13. 1834 he married , who was born in Bedford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Dec 20. 1808.
“Sept 16. 1835 he was appointed in company with as a committee and general agent to act in the name of, and for the . In the winter of 1835-6 he chopped cord wood for .
“In 1838 he travelled in company with his brother Joseph from to . He passed through the mobbing of that year, in and in , and his family suffered nigh unto death from exposure as they were driven about by the mob. He was in the battle, and immediately after, by the counsel of Prest , with bros. , Benjamin L. Clapp, and about twenty others they fled for by the wilderness through the North part of and the Southern part of . Messengers overtook them and informed them that had sent a company of fifty well armed men to follow them, with strict orders not to return until they had brought back the company either dead or alive. When this word came a halt was called, and asked what they should do in case the enemy overtook them; after a few moment’s consultation the whole company covenanted with uplifted hands to heaven, that if they were overtaken they would fight till they died, and not a man would fall into the hands of the enemy alive. They then travelled on ten miles and camped on the edge of some timber on the North side of a four mile prairie, and they afterwards learned that their enemies camped on the South edge of the same prairie, and would have overtaken them next day, had not the Lord sent a heavy snow storm during the night; and when the brethren arose in the morning, remarked, that that snow storm was their salvation. The air was so full of snow they could hardly find their [HC 7:219] horses to saddle them, but they soon mounted their horses and continued their journey as fast as they could. The storm was from the North and in their faces; it filled their tracks in a few moments so that ’s men could not follow. It was reported that this company of men on their return informed the that they could not overtake the [p. 290]
Page 290