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Introduction to Johnson v. Remonstrants

Johnson v. Remonstrants
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 5 April 1834
 
Historical Introduction
In June 1833, the mercantile firm purchased a three-story brick located in , Ohio, on behalf of the . Following the destruction of the church’s printing operation in in July 1833, the inn became the temporary location for a newly acquired printing press that continued publication of the church periodical, The Evening and the Morning Star. The church maintained ownership of the inn while granting rights to oversee its operation.
In April 1834 applied to the Court of Common Pleas in , Ohio, for a license to operate a tavern. His application was challenged by a . Johnson also needed to demonstrate through one or more witnesses that the tavern was necessary “for the public convenience” and that he had “a good moral character” and “suitable accommodations.” JS and John Johnson Jr. apparently supplied such testimony; JS’s journal noted that on Saturday, 5 April, JS “returned to as witness for fath[er] [John] Johnson.”
After hearing the evidence for and against the application, the court ruled in favor of and set the license fee at six dollars. The statute then required the clerk of the court to provide the applicant with a certificate, which was taken to the county treasurer, who was authorized to receive payment of the licensing fee. After payment, the treasurer provided a receipt of payment, which entitled the applicant to receive “a license under the seal of the court.” None of these documents is extant.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
Johnson v. Remonstrants
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 5 April 1834
 
Historical Introduction
In June 1833, the mercantile firm purchased a three-story brick located in , Ohio, on behalf of the . Following the destruction of the church’s printing operation in in July 1833, the inn became the temporary location for a newly acquired printing press that continued publication of the church periodical, The Evening and the Morning Star. The church maintained ownership of the inn while granting rights to oversee its operation.
In April 1834 applied to the Court of Common Pleas in , Ohio, for a license to operate a tavern. His application was challenged by a . Johnson also needed to demonstrate through one or more witnesses that the tavern was necessary “for the public convenience” and that he had “a good moral character” and “suitable accommodations.” JS and John Johnson Jr. apparently supplied such testimony; JS’s journal noted that on Saturday, 5 April, JS “returned to as witness for fath[er] [John] Johnson.”
After hearing the evidence for and against the application, the court ruled in favor of and set the license fee at six dollars. The statute then required the clerk of the court to provide the applicant with a certificate, which was taken to the county treasurer, who was authorized to receive payment of the licensing fee. After payment, the treasurer provided a receipt of payment, which entitled the applicant to receive “a license under the seal of the court.” None of these documents is extant.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.