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Introduction to JS for the use of J. Hitchcock and J. R. Hitchcock v. Cheney

JS for the use of J. Hitchcock and J. R. Hitchcock v. Cheney
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 24 October 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 21 September 1836, Elijah Cheney signed a note promising to repay $200.39 borrowed from JS. Whether this promissory note reflected a debt for goods, services rendered by JS to Cheney, or a sum borrowed is unknown. The note was due upon demand. to John Hitchcock and his son James R., hardware merchants operating in under the name of Hitchcock & Son. This firm had several business dealings with the church.
By June 1837, the note remained unpaid and this action was commenced in behalf of the Hitchcocks. The Court of Common Pleas issued a summons, which was served on Cheney by either second sheriff or deputy sheriff . , a , Ohio, attorney, represented the plaintiffs’ interest and on 10 July 1837 filed a declaration asking for $400 in damages. When the case came to trial in October 1837, Cheney failed to appear, and the court entered a default judgment in favor of the plaintiff, with damages assessed at $213.92 plus costs. Efforts to collect the judgment were “wholly unsatisfied for want of property,” likely because Cheney no longer owned property in the area.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
JS for the use of J. Hitchcock and J. R. Hitchcock v. Cheney
Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas, 24 October 1837
 
Historical Introduction
On 21 September 1836, Elijah Cheney signed a note promising to repay $200.39 borrowed from JS. Whether this promissory note reflected a debt for goods, services rendered by JS to Cheney, or a sum borrowed is unknown. The note was due upon demand. to John Hitchcock and his son James R., hardware merchants operating in under the name of Hitchcock & Son. This firm had several business dealings with the church.
By June 1837, the note remained unpaid and this action was commenced in behalf of the Hitchcocks. The Court of Common Pleas issued a summons, which was served on Cheney by either second sheriff or deputy sheriff . , a , Ohio, attorney, represented the plaintiffs’ interest and on 10 July 1837 filed a declaration asking for $400 in damages. When the case came to trial in October 1837, Cheney failed to appear, and the court entered a default judgment in favor of the plaintiff, with damages assessed at $213.92 plus costs. Efforts to collect the judgment were “wholly unsatisfied for want of property,” likely because Cheney no longer owned property in the area.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
 
 
JS for the use of J. Hitchcock and J. R. Hitchcock v. Cheney, Geauga Co., Ohio, Court of Common Pleas