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Introduction to State of Illinois v. Eagle and State of Illinois v. Sympson

State of Illinois v. Eagle
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 22 December 1843
 
State of Illinois v. Sympson
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 17 January 1844
 
Historical Introduction
Late on the night of 10 December 1843, two men with blackened faces came to the home of and Hannah Badham in , Illinois, ostensibly to deliver a family letter and request lodging. Richard Badham suspected they had an “evil design” and refused them entry. The assailants rushed into the home, assaulted and bound Richard, and demanded a large sum of money purportedly in his possession. Hannah gave the assailants $4.50, a gun, and a watch. After Richard shouted for help, the assailants stabbed him in the abdomen and left the scene. The injury was not fatal.
JS filed a complaint against on or before 22 December 1843 for the robbery and assault of , and justice of the peace issued a warrant for Eagle’s arrest. Additionally, Johnson issued subpoenas for the Badhams and two other witnesses. Justices of the peace Johnson and both presided over the court of inquiry in fulfillment of statutory requirements. Eagle pleaded not guilty to the charges. After hearing testimony, the court dismissed Eagle “for want of evidence.”
The following month, JS filed a separate complaint based on information he received that had been involved in the robbery and assault. issued a warrant for Sympson’s arrest. Although JS, , and Hannah Badham were all sworn at Sympson’s hearing, Johnson’s docket records summary testimony only from the Badhams. Their testimony indicated Sympson “was not the Person that was intended by Badham to have been arrestted.” According to Sympson, JS “made affidavit” against him before Justice Johnson, but after Richard Badham failed to identify Sympson as his assailant, JS denied that he ever believed Sympson was guilty. Sympson further related that JS defended his actions by claiming that the affidavit “was couched in stronger language than he had intended to swear to” and that while he had signed the affidavit, he had not actually sworn to it. After hearing testimony, Johnson discharged Sympson for lack of evidence.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
State of Illinois v. Eagle
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 22 December 1843
 
State of Illinois v. Sympson
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 17 January 1844
 
Historical Introduction
Late on the night of 10 December 1843, two men with blackened faces came to the home of and Hannah Badham in , Illinois, ostensibly to deliver a family letter and request lodging. Richard Badham suspected they had an “evil design” and refused them entry. The assailants rushed into the home, assaulted and bound Richard, and demanded a large sum of money purportedly in his possession. Hannah gave the assailants $4.50, a gun, and a watch. After Richard shouted for help, the assailants stabbed him in the abdomen and left the scene. The injury was not fatal.
JS filed a complaint against on or before 22 December 1843 for the robbery and assault of , and justice of the peace issued a warrant for Eagle’s arrest. Additionally, Johnson issued subpoenas for the Badhams and two other witnesses. Justices of the peace Johnson and both presided over the court of inquiry in fulfillment of statutory requirements. Eagle pleaded not guilty to the charges. After hearing testimony, the court dismissed Eagle “for want of evidence.”
The following month, JS filed a separate complaint based on information he received that had been involved in the robbery and assault. issued a warrant for Sympson’s arrest. Although JS, , and Hannah Badham were all sworn at Sympson’s hearing, Johnson’s docket records summary testimony only from the Badhams. Their testimony indicated Sympson “was not the Person that was intended by Badham to have been arrestted.” According to Sympson, JS “made affidavit” against him before Justice Johnson, but after Richard Badham failed to identify Sympson as his assailant, JS denied that he ever believed Sympson was guilty. Sympson further related that JS defended his actions by claiming that the affidavit “was couched in stronger language than he had intended to swear to” and that while he had signed the affidavit, he had not actually sworn to it. After hearing testimony, Johnson discharged Sympson for lack of evidence.
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.
 
State of Illinois v. Eagle, Justice of the Peace Court
 
State of Illinois v. Sympson, Justice of the Peace Court