Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 3, 15 July 1843–29 February 1844

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Book 3, 15 July 1843–29 February 1844

Editorial Note
’s third memorandum book records JS’s continued participation in various business, legal, civic, and ecclesiastical affairs in 1843 and early 1844. JS’s involvement in both local and national politics, especially after being nominated as a presidential candidate in January 1844, figures prominently in the record, as does his continued concern about his enemies in and the Saints’ efforts to obtain redress for losses they had earlier suffered there. Richards also recorded several of JS’s public discourses and noted the beginning of his efforts to find a new place in the West where church members could gather—efforts that would take on added significance when the Council of Fifty, organized in March 1844, took oversight of the project. Prominent, too, in this book are JS’s estrangement from and his difficulties with . Against a backdrop of court cases, visits to the theater, city council meetings, and other activities, Richards also recorded numerous meetings in which ordinances and teachings that would later be performed and taught in the were given to select individuals.

[front cover]
Book 3, 15 July 1843–29 February 1844

Editorial Note
’s third memorandum book records JS’s continued participation in various business, legal, civic, and ecclesiastical affairs in 1843 and early 1844. JS’s involvement in both local and national politics, especially after being nominated as a presidential candidate in January 1844, figures prominently in the record, as does his continued concern about his enemies in and the Saints’ efforts to obtain redress for losses they had earlier suffered there. Richards also recorded several of JS’s public discourses and noted the beginning of his efforts to find a new place in the West where church members could gather—efforts that would take on added significance when the Council of Fifty, organized in March 1844, took oversight of the project. Prominent, too, in this book are JS’s estrangement from and his difficulties with . Against a backdrop of court cases, visits to the theater, city council meetings, and other activities, Richards also recorded numerous meetings in which ordinances and teachings that would later be performed and taught in the were given to select individuals.

[front cover]
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