Letter from Dan Jones, 8 January 1844

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My Dear Friend
I wrote to you from by the S.Bt. [Steamboat] Genl. Brooks , and again by mail, I have not as yet heard anything from you, Tis with the most painful sensation that I write you this letter & yet I deem it my duty towards you, as well as myself to give you a fair and impartial Account of some of the transactions on board since I saw you, In the first place when left me at , we differed some in our settlement, (altho I have not dispu[te]d any of his Acts Accounts) only in regard to the Amt of cash of yr. [your]first purchase to be deducted out of yr. Bill, however it never occured to me that any difficulty shd. [should]arise from that between us, especially as I did not then, nor have I since once asked for a divident, nor even my wages, but in full faith depend[e]d on a fair & amicable settlement, which I always have and ever will by be ready to do with you, & regardless of whatever misrepresentations may have been made to you from other sources, you promised at my particular request to hear me also before you would decide & may God forbid that the first thoug[ht] Shd. enter my heart to wrong you in word or deed, for I am well aware that you have been wronged enough by yr. enemies, & now I pledge myself as willing as ever, at all risks to render you any asistance in my power in in person or and principle, I make these assertions, because I have reason to think by various circumstances as well as by information that the tongues of slander & deceit have been busy to misrepresent my character towards you. I have considerable difficulty with not only on account of neglecting his buisness by dissipating habits to the extremes of any I ever knew in his situation, I have remonstrated with against his almost incessant propensity to Gambling but in vain as a proof which in one instance only will I mention when he gambled in a Tavarn after bed time lost what money he had with him, gave the Cook a boy of 15 yrs. the Keys to go on board and bring him $30. out of the Office, which he did, the consequence was that that boy had money to lend all hands nor could I imagine at the time where he could have had so much money, nor is this a Solitary instance by any means, but to the contrary, as you may easily ascertain by all on board that his conduct since on board has been highly immoral & negligent in the [p. [1]]
My Dear Friend
I wrote to you from by the S.Bt. Steamboat Genl. Brooks , and again by mail, I have not as yet heard anything from you, Tis with the most painful sensation that I write you this letter & yet I deem it my duty towards you, as well as myself to give you a fair and impartial Account of some of the transactions on board since I saw you, In the first place when left me at , we differed some in our settlement, (altho I have not disputed any of his Accounts) only in regard to the Amt of cash of yr. [your]first purchase to be deducted out of yr. Bill, however it never occured to me that any difficulty shd. [should]arise from that between us, especially as I did not then, nor have I since once asked for a divident, nor even my wages, but in full faith depended on a fair & amicable settlement, which I always have and ever will be ready to do with you, & regardless of whatever misrepresentations may have been made to you from other sources, you promised at my particular request to hear me also before you would decide & may God forbid that the first thought Shd. enter my heart to wrong you in word or deed, for I am well aware that you have been wronged enough by yr. enemies, & now I pledge myself as willing as ever, at all risks to render you any asistance in my power in in person and principle, I make these assertions, because I have reason to think by various circumstances as well as by information that the tongues of slander & deceit have been busy to misrepresent my character towards you. I have considerable difficulty with not only on account of neglecting his buisness by dissipating habits to the extremes of any I ever knew in his situation, I have remonstrated with against his almost incessant propensity to Gambling but in vain as a proof which in one instance only will I mention when he gambled in a Tavarn after bed time lost what money he had with him, gave the Cook a boy of 15 yrs. the Keys to go on board and bring him $30. out of the Office, which he did, the consequence was that that boy had money to lend all hands nor could I imagine at the time where he could have had so much money, nor is this a Solitary instance by any means, but to the contrary, as you may easily ascertain by all on board that his conduct since on board has been highly immoral & negligent in the [p. [1]]
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