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Letter from James Arlington Bennet, 20 February 1843

  • Source Note
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Feby 20th— 1843.
Leiut. Gen. Smith.
DearSir,
I am extremely happy to know that you are now completely free from that unrigteous persecution got up against you by & & that the corrupt attempts to repeal your charter have failed. But if they had repealed them it would only have given you a little trouble as the Judiciary would most unquestionably have rectified their conduct.
On the reception of your letter on the subject of your peculiar distressed Situation I instantly wrote to Governers & on the subject, stated to both that having seen , I was in full possession of all the facts & evidence in the Case & that I was so well satisfied of the gross injustice & unfounded nature of the charge against you I should, in case they persisted in bring<​ing​> you to trial, appear myself in person for the defence both as evidence against from his confession to me, and as Counsel on your behalf and that they had no chance whatever of Success. I sent the letter of your to my wife and one from ’s fatherinlaw, to . This course I have no doubt has had its full effect. I also wrote to at enjoining it on him to abandon the prosecution & to write to & to that effect & if he would not that I should appear for you. I have however never received any answer & I presume from subsequent conduct he paid no regard to my admonition. You destroyed several of his deep laid plans & one in particular in which through me he expected to get a wife worth half a million. But I never was more decieved in a man every way as his discription of himself in his letter to me made me think he was the Magnus Apollo. He is extremely superficial in education & the rest every body may know. If I were to judge the Nauvoo Legion by s Military knowledge I should rate it very low I therefore think you [p. 1]
Feby 20th— 1843.
Leiut. Gen. Smith.
DearSir,
I am extremely happy to know that you are now completely free from that unrigteous persecution got up against you by & & that the corrupt attempts to repeal your charter have failed. But if they had repealed them it would only have given you a little trouble as the Judiciary would most unquestionably have rectified their conduct.
On the reception of your letter on the subject of your peculiar distressed Situation I instantly wrote to Governers & on the subject, stated to both that having seen , I was in full possession of all the facts & evidence in the Case & that I was so well satisfied of the gross injustice & unfounded nature of the charge against you I should, in case they persisted in bringing you to trial, appear myself in person for the defence both as evidence against from his confession to me, and as Counsel on your behalf and that they had no chance whatever of Success. I sent the letter of your to my wife and one from ’s fatherinlaw, to . This course I have no doubt has had its full effect. I also wrote to at enjoining it on him to abandon the prosecution & to write to & to that effect & if he would not that I should appear for you. I have however never received any answer & I presume from subsequent conduct he paid no regard to my admonition. You destroyed several of his deep laid plans & one in particular in which through me he expected to get a wife worth half a million. But I never was more decieved in a man every way as his discription of himself in his letter to me made me think he was the Magnus Apollo. He is extremely superficial in education & the rest every body may know. If I were to judge the Nauvoo Legion by s Military knowledge I should rate it very low I therefore think you [p. 1]
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