Letter from Lewis Cass, 9 December 1843

  • Source Note
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as all other persons are treated in this . That is they should be protected in their rights, and punished when they violate the laws. Our constitution recognizes no system of religion, either as a test for public office, or as a condition for private protection, and all whatever may be their faith or worship, are equal before the law.
In thus stating great general principles I have stated what would be my rule of action, as a magistrate or as a citizen, should any case arise requiring my decision. Farther than this, I can make no declaration. Of the facts to which you refer, I have but a vague knowledge, having been absent from the , during the period of their occurrence. I am bound however, in candor to add, that if your application for the redress to which you consider yourselves entitled has been, as you say rejected by the Constituted authorities of the State of , and by Congress, I do not see what power, the President of the can have over the matter, or how he can interfere in it.
Very respectfully I am Sir Your obt. servt.
.
Gen. Joseph Smith
[p. [2]]
as all other persons are treated in this . That is they should be protected in their rights, and punished when they violate the laws. Our constitution recognizes no system of religion, either as a test for public office, or as a condition for private protection, and all whatever may be their faith or worship, are equal before the law.
In thus stating great general principles I have stated what would be my rule of action, as a magistrate or as a citizen, should any case arise requiring my decision. Farther than this, I can make no declaration. Of the facts to which you refer, I have but a vague knowledge, having been absent from the , during the period of their occurrence. I am bound however, in candor to add, that if your application for the redress to which you consider yourselves entitled has been, as you say rejected by the Constituted authorities of the State of , and by Congress, I do not see what power, the President of the can have over the matter, or how he can interfere in it.
Very respectfully I am Sir Your obt. servt.
.
Gen. Joseph Smith
[p. [2]]
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