Letter from Lyman Littlefield, 16 February 1844

  • Source Note
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, Ill.,)
Feb. 16, 1844)
President Joseph Smith:—
Dear Sir: Permit me to address you a few lines. I have not, heretofore, obtruded a communication upon you, or troubled you relative to my cause. It would be supurfluous to enter into preliminaries. It is as well known to yourself as to me that there has a difference existed between us, for sometime. At least, I have had good reasons to be lieve that your feelings were somewhat insenced at me. My object in penning this letter is to have this matter honorably and amicably adjusted. Am I to be disappointed? On my part, be assured, there shall be nothing lacking. May I hope for the like reciprocal feelings in you? All I shall require is for you to say that you will forgive me <​my​> past foibles. Will you do it? A request of this nature would once have been looked upon by me as the greatest humiliation. I could not have humbled myself so much, in my own estima [p. [1]]
, Ill.,)
Feb. 16, 1844)
President Joseph Smith:—
Dear Sir: Permit me to address you a few lines. I have not, heretofore, obtruded a communication upon you, or troubled you relative to my cause. It would be supurfluous to enter into preliminaries. It is as well known to yourself as to me that there has a difference existed between us, for sometime. At least, I have had good reasons to be lieve that your feelings were somewhat insenced at me. My object in penning this letter is to have this matter honorably and amicably adjusted. Am I to be disappointed? On my part, be assured, there shall be nothing lacking. May I hope for the like reciprocal feelings in you? All I shall require is for you to say that you will forgive my past foibles. Will you do it? A request of this nature would once have been looked upon by me as the greatest humiliation. I could not have humbled myself so much, in my own estima [p. [1]]
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