Letter from Orson Hyde, 11 June 1844

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June 11th. 1844.
Dear Brethren,
I have just returned from a visit to the . He devotes but 2 hours each day to business calls, from 11 till 1 o’clock. Many from all parts of the Union call daily to see him. He, consequently, is unable to devote but little time to each visitor. A word of explanation must suffice, and then one must give place to others. I presented him with the memorial. He read it attentively through; and then remarked that the object was most unquestionably a good one. The possession and settlement of appears to be the leading feature in the memorial said he, and you will recollect, continues he, that in my annual message I recommended to Congress the establishing of <a line of> forts through to that country for the protection of all United States citizens emigrating to that country Territory. Now does not this embrace all you want? I answered, no Sir! We shall go in bodies sufficiently large to protect ourselvs through the Indian territories. Mr. Smith wishes the executive to throw a shield over him while his operations are confined to the in raising and fitting out said volunteers. He says, Mr. Smith may go on and do as he wishes, and this government will extend the same protection to him that it will to any other citizen. I observed to him, that this memorial originated upon the ground that the same protection had not heretofore been extended to him that had been to others. He replied that that was oweing to peculiar circumstances, wherein [p. [1]]
June 11th. 1844.
Dear Brethren,
I have just returned from a visit to the . He devotes but 2 hours each day to business calls, from 11 till 1 o’clock. Many from all parts of the Union call daily to see him. He, consequently, is able to devote but little time to each visitor. A word of explanation must suffice, and then one must give place to others. I presented him with the memorial. He read it attentively through; and then remarked that the object was most unquestionably a good one. The possession and settlement of appears to be the leading feature in the memorial said he, and you will recollect, continues he, that in my annual message I recommended to Congress the establishing of a line of forts through to that country for the protection of all United States citizens emigrating to that Territory. Now does not this embrace all you want? I answered, no Sir! We shall go in bodies sufficiently large to protect ourselvs through the Indian territories. Mr. Smith wishes the executive to throw a shield over him while his operations are confined to the in raising and fitting out said volunteers. He says, Mr. Smith may go on and do as he wishes, and this government will extend the same protection to him that it will to any other citizen. I observed to him, that this memorial originated upon the ground that the same protection had not heretofore been extended to him that had been to others. He replied that that was oweing to peculiar circumstances, wherein [p. [1]]
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