Letter from Orson Hyde, 26 April 1844

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Apl. 26th. 1844.
Dear Sir,
To day I trouble you with another communication, which you will please have the goodness to lay before our council.
We were last evening introduced to the , at the white House by the politeness of Maj. [James] Semple where we spent an hour very agreeably. The is a very plain, homespun, familiar, farmer-like man. He spoke of our troubles in and regretted that we had met with such treatment. He asked how we were getting along in . I told him that we were contending with the difficulties of a new country, and labouring under the disadvantageous circumstances <consequences> of being driven from our property and homes in .
We have this day had a long converzation with . He is ripe for , and the . He said he would resign his seat in Congress, if he could command the force that Mr. Smith could, and would be on the march to that Country in a month.
I learn that the eyes of many aspiring politicians in this place are upon that country; and that there is so much jealousy between them that they will probably pass no bill in relation to it. Now all these politicians rely upon the arm of our government to protect them there, and if government were to pass an act establishing a territorial government [p. 1]
Apl. 26th. 1844.
Dear Sir,
To day I trouble you with another communication, which you will please have the goodness to lay before our council.
We were last evening introduced to the , at the white House by the politeness of Maj. [James] Semple where we spent an hour very agreeably. The is a very plain, homespun, familiar, farmer-like man. He spoke of our troubles in and regretted that we had met with such treatment. He asked how we were getting along in . I told him that we were contending with the difficulties of a new country, and labouring under the disadvantageous consequences of being driven from our property and homes in .
We have this day had a long converzation with . He is ripe for , and the . He said he would resign his seat in Congress, if he could command the force that Mr. Smith could, and would be on the march to that Country in a month.
I learn that the eyes of many aspiring politicians in this place are upon that country; and that there is so much jealousy between them that they will probably pass no bill in relation to it. Now all these politicians rely upon the arm of our government to protect them there, and if government were to pass an act establishing a territorial government [p. 1]
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