Letter from Orson Hyde, 30 April 1844

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April 30th. 1844.
Dear Brethren,
As the subjects to which our attention has recently been directed, are so all absorbing to the mind, that I am induced to write often, and lay before you from time to time, the train of my own thoughts upon matters engrossing the interest of our entire community; giving you an opportunity to glean therefrom such relics as, in your better judgment, may tend to facilitate the execution of the grand scheme which has so deeply enlisted our united energies.
It is now reduced to a certainty, that will not be admitted into our , at present; for Messrs. and have both taken a stand adverse to the annexation of that territory to our in their letters received here yesterday. This has given an additional radiance of hope to the men, but has smitten the Vanites with wild confusion. They know not what to do. They talk of other Candidates. They want some one who will go for and . I have proposed Genl. Smith to them, and told them that his measures embraced every thing they could desire, but it passed off with a smile. One of the Memorials sent by me will be read in the Senate today by Maj. [James] Semple, and the other in the house on Monday next by in all probability. The Bill in the Senate will be referred to the committee on who are composed entirely of southwestern members, with of for chairman; and having introduced a bill on [p. [1]]
April 30th. 1844.
Dear Brethren,
As the subjects to which our attention has recently been directed, are so all absorbing to the mind, that I am induced to write often, and lay before you from time to time, the train of my own thoughts upon matters engrossing the interest of our entire community; giving you an opportunity to glean therefrom such relics as, in your better judgment, may tend to facilitate the execution of the grand scheme which has so deeply enlisted our united energies.
It is now reduced to a certainty, that will not be admitted into our , at present; for Messrs. and have both taken a stand adverse to the annexation of that territory to our in their letters received here yesterday. This has given an additional radiance of hope to the men, but has smitten the Vanites with wild confusion. They know not what to do. They talk of other Candidates. They want some one who will go for and . I have proposed Genl. Smith to them, and told them that his measures embraced every thing they could desire, but it passed off with a smile. One of the Memorials sent by me will be read in the Senate today by Maj. [James] Semple, and the other in the house on Monday next by in all probability. The Bill in the Senate will be referred to the committee on who are composed entirely of southwestern members, with of for chairman; and having introduced a bill on [p. [1]]
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