Letter from Orson Hyde, 9 June 1844

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June 9th.1844.
Dear Brethren,
I arrived in this place again last evening, and met here Elders and who presented me with a letter from you; tho’ it was severe, I was glad to receive it. I am aware that our council stands on the summit of all earthly power, and that he who presides over it is God’s messenger to execute justice and judgment in the Earth, and that any seeming neglect to maintain his dignity and honor, and that also of the council generally, touches a very tender place, and renders the delinquent justly entitled to the censure and warm reproof of your dignified and honorable body.
While, therefore, I acknowledge that the blow which has fallen upon me, has been inflicted by the hand of friendship nerved with a jealous regard for rights which Heaven has made your own, I pray you to indulge me a little while I relate the circumstances under which I have been placed, and earnestly beg your honorable body to consider them. If I have committed an error, there is one avenue of consolation which is not closed up; and that is, I have committed it with a heart unres[er]vedly devoted to your best interest.
You say, distinctly, in your letter, that “the people are the Sovreign,” and intimate that Senators and representatives are not sent here to do their own will, but the will of the people who send them. This very position was taken by Genl. [James] Semple who, on reading the bill, asked [p. 1]
June 9th.1844.
Dear Brethren,
I arrived in this place again last evening, and met here Elders and who presented me with a letter from you; tho’ it was severe, I was glad to receive it. I am aware that our council stands on the summit of all earthly power, and that he who presides over it is God’s messenger to execute justice and judgment in the Earth, and that any seeming neglect to maintain his dignity and honor, and that also of the council generally, touches a very tender place, and renders the delinquent justly entitled to the censure and warm reproof of your dignified and honorable body.
While, therefore, I acknowledge that the blow which has fallen upon me, has been inflicted by the hand of friendship nerved with a jealous regard for rights which Heaven has made your own, I pray you to indulge me a little while I relate the circumstances under which I have been placed, and earnestly beg your honorable body to consider them. If I have committed an error, there is one avenue of consolation which is not closed up; and that is, I have committed it with a heart unreservedly devoted to your best interest.
You say, distinctly, in your letter, that “the people are the Sovreign,” and intimate that Senators and representatives are not sent here to do their own will, but the will of the people who send them. This very position was taken by Genl. [James] Semple who, on reading the bill, asked [p. 1]
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