Letterbook 2

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 212
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you will have no cause for complaint. We intend to struggle with all our misfortunes of life, and Shoulder them up handsomely like men. We ask nothing, therefore, but what ought to be required between man and man, and by those principles which bind man to man, by kindred blood, in bearing our own part in every thing which duty calls us to do, as not inferior of to any of the human race; and we will be treated as such although we differ with some in matters of opinion in things, (Viz: Religious matters,) for which we only feel ourselves amenable to the Eternal God. And may God forbid that pride, ambition, a want of humanity or any degree of importance, unjustly, should have any dominion in our bosoms. We are the sons of Adam. We are the free born sons of ; and having been trampled upon and our rights taken from us, even our Constitutional rights, by a great many who boast themselves of being valient in freedom’s cause, while their hearts possess not a spark of its benign and enlivening influence, it will afford a sufficient escuse [excuse], we hope, for any harsh remarks that may have been dropped by us, when we thought there was an assumption of superiority designed to gall our feelings. We are very sensitive as a people,— We confess it— But we want to be pardoned for our sins if any we have committed.
With regard to the time when the first payment of interest should be called for, it appears that we misunderstood each other. But suffice it to say, that it shall not prevent our making arrangements concerning the whole matter. It is still, however, my firm conviction that my understanding concerning the interest was correct.—
I remain, gentlemen, with sentiments of Respect Yours &c—
Joseph Smith
clk’s name not in the original. pr. [p. 212]
you will have no cause for complaint. We intend to struggle with all our misfortunes of life, and Shoulder them up handsomely like men. We ask nothing, therefore, but what ought to be required between man and man, and by those principles which bind man to man, by kindred blood, in bearing our own part in every thing which duty calls us to do, as not inferior to any of the human race; and we will be treated as such although we differ with some in matters of opinion in things, (Viz: Religious matters,) for which we only feel ourselves amenable to the Eternal God. And may God forbid that pride, ambition, a want of humanity or any degree of importance, unjustly, should have any dominion in our bosoms. We are the sons of Adam. We are the free born sons of ; and having been trampled upon and our rights taken from us, even our Constitutional rights, by a great many who boast themselves of being valient in freedom’s cause, while their hearts possess not a spark of its benign and enlivening influence, it will afford a sufficient escuse [excuse], we hope, for any harsh remarks that may have been dropped by us, when we thought there was an assumption of superiority designed to gall our feelings. We are very sensitive as a people,— We confess it— But we want to be pardoned for our sins if any we have committed.
With regard to the time when the first payment of interest should be called for, it appears that we misunderstood each other. But suffice it to say, that it shall not prevent our making arrangements concerning the whole matter. It is still, however, my firm conviction that my understanding concerning the interest was correct.—
I remain, gentlemen, with sentiments of Respect Yours &c—
Joseph Smith
Page 212