Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [6], bk. 16
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my children said do not cry any more the mob will not kill them for the Lord has signified to me that he will deliver them out of the hands of their enemies. This was a great comfort to us all and we were not so much distressed afterwards as to their lives being taken— As soon as was able to stir about a little he besought his to leave the place and come <​move​> to but would not consent to do this for he was in hopes that our sons would be liberated and peace be settled again still expostulated with him but to no effect and he at last declared that he would not go away from unless he was called upon to do so by revelation very well said I can give you revelation then and he rehearsed the vision which he had related to me— made answer to this they that the family Migh might get ready to start and then if we were obliged to go there would be nothing to hinder us—
Our buisness had been trading in corn and wheat as well as keeping a public house and when the Mob came in we had some corn and wheat on hands but no a very little flour or meal and we sent a young man that lived with us to Mill with some 14 bags of Grain to be Ground but he was obliged to leave in consequence of the mob who so near at hand that Miller deemed it unsafe for him to allow the brethren to remain about his mill least they the <​mob​> Militia should burn his premises— We were therefore obliged to bruise our corn in a samp mortar to make bread of and it was all the bread stuff we had for a length of time— but there were many who subsisted some time on parched corn for they were all driven in from the country and there was more than an acre of land in front of our house that was covered with beds laying in the open sun where men women and children were compelled to sleep in all weather for these were the last who had got into the and all the houses were so full that there was not no [p. [6], bk. 16]
my children said do not cry any more the mob will not kill them for the Lord has signified to me that he will deliver them out of the hands of their enemies. This was a great comfort to us all and we were not so much distressed afterwards as to their lives being taken— As soon as was able to stir about a little he besought his to leave the place and move to but would not consent to do this for he was in hopes that our sons would be liberated and peace be settled again still expostulated with him but to no effect and he at last declared that he would not go away from unless he was called upon to do so by revelation very well said I can give you revelation then and he rehearsed the vision which he had related to me— made answer to this that the family might get ready to start and then if we were obliged to go there would be nothing to hinder us—
Our buisness had been trading in corn and wheat as well as keeping a public house and when the Mob came in we had some corn and wheat on hands but a very little flour or meal and we sent a young man that lived with us to Mill with some 14 bags of Grain to be Ground but he was obliged to leave in consequence of the mob who so near at hand that Miller deemed it unsafe for him to allow the brethren to remain about his mill least the mob Militia should burn his premises— We were therefore obliged to bruise our corn in a samp mortar to make bread of and it was all the bread stuff we had for a length of time— but there were many who subsisted some time on parched corn for they were all driven in from the country and there was more than an acre of land in front of our house that was covered with beds laying in the open sun where men women and children were compelled to sleep in all weather for these were the last who had got into the and all the houses were so full that there was no [p. [6], bk. 16]
Page [6], bk. 16