Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the first counsel of this kind, was held in a room adjoining that in which and a young man by the name of Robinson were printing. Mr. Robinson being curious to know what they were doing in the next room, applied his ear to a hole in the petition wall, and by this means overheard the following remarks and resolutions:
“Now, gentlemen,’ said the speaker, “this gold Bible, which the Smiths are publishing, is destined to break down every thing before it if we do not put an end to it— yes, this very thing is calculated to prove a serious injury to all religious denominations; and, in a little while many of our excellent ministers, good men, who have no other means of obtaining a respectable livelihood than by preaching, will be deprived of their salaries, which is their living— Gentlemen, shall we endure this? (“No, No; was the unanimous reply) How then shall we prevent the printing of this thing?”
It was then resolved by the meeting, that three of their company should be appointed to go to the house of , on the following Tuesday or wednesday, while the men were gone to their work, and request to read the manuscript to them:— that, after she had done reading it two of the company should endeavor to divert her attention from it to some other object, while the third, seizing the opportunity, should snatch it from the drawers, or wherever it should be kept, and commit it immediately to the flames.
Again said the speaker: suppose we fail in this, and the book is printed, in defiance of all that we can do to the contrary; what measures shall we then adopt? Shall we buy their books, and allow our families to read them?” They all responded, No.
They then entered into a solemn convenant, never to [p. 160]
the first counsel of this kind, was held in a room adjoining that in which and a young man by the name of Robinson were printing. Mr. Robinson being curious to know what they were doing in the next room, applied his ear to a hole in the petition wall, and by this means overheard the following remarks and resolutions:
“Now, gentlemen,’ said the speaker, “this gold Bible, which the Smiths are publishing, is destined to break down every thing before it if we do not put an end to it— yes, this very thing is calculated to prove a serious injury to all religious denominations; and, in a little while many of our excellent ministers, good men, who have no other means of obtaining a respectable livelihood than by preaching, will be deprived of their salaries, which is their living— Gentlemen, shall we endure this? (“No, No; was the unanimous reply) How then shall we prevent the printing of this thing?”
It was then resolved by the meeting, that three of their company should be appointed to go to the house of , on the following Tuesday or wednesday, while the men were gone to their work, and request to read the manuscript to them:— that, after she had done reading it two of the company should endeavor to divert her attention from it to some other object, while the third, seizing the opportunity, should snatch it from the drawers, or wherever it should be kept, and commit it immediately to the flames.
Again said the speaker: suppose we fail in this, and the book is printed, in defiance of all that we can do to the contrary; what measures shall we then adopt? Shall we buy their books, and allow our families to read them?” They all responded, No.
They then entered into a solemn convenant, never to [p. 160]
Page 160