Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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board. We had to pay all our money (five dollars) for fare, and eat and lie among negroes, as we took a deck passage. About ninety miles from our boat got aground, where it lay for three days. During which time we had nothing to eat except a little parched corn. They finally gave up the boat and left her. We went to the clerk and got two dollars of our money back; after which we went on board of a little boat that landed us in the next morning. Here we found — he told us that Joseph was a prisoner with many others; and, that was killed; giving us a long and sorrowful accunt of the sufferings of the Saints, which filled our hearts with sorrow.
The next morning we started again on our journey. When we arrived at we stopped at the house of George Lyman’s to rest; he being uncle to cousin , whose feet had now become very sore with travelling. Here we heard dredful tales concerning our friends in — that they were all murdered— and, that my brothers, Joseph and , were shot with a hundred balls.
We had not been long in till the mob made a rally to use us up with the rest of the Smiths; and, at the earnest request of our friends we thought best to push on. The wind was in our faces, the ground was slippery, it was night and very dark; nevertheless, we proceeded on our journey. Travelling 22 miles we came to the Chariton river, which we found frozen over; but the ice was too weak to bear us, and the boat on the west side of the river. We went [p. 324]
board. We had to pay all our money (five dollars) for fare, and eat and lie among negroes, as we took a deck passage. About ninety miles from our boat got aground, where it lay for three days. During which time we had nothing to eat except a little parched corn. They finally gave up the boat and left her. We went to the clerk and got two dollars of our money back; after which we went on board of a little boat that landed us in the next morning. Here we found — he told us that Joseph was a prisoner with many others; and, that was killed; giving us a long and sorrowful accunt of the sufferings of the Saints, which filled our hearts with sorrow.
The next morning we started again on our journey. When we arrived at we stopped at the house of George Lyman’s to rest; he being uncle to cousin , whose feet had now become very sore with travelling. Here we heard dredful tales concerning our friends in — that they were all murdered— and, that my brothers, Joseph and , were shot with a hundred balls.
We had not been long in till the mob made a rally to use us up with the rest of the Smiths; and, at the earnest request of our friends we thought best to push on. The wind was in our faces, the ground was slippery, it was night and very dark; nevertheless, we proceeded on our journey. Travelling 22 miles we came to the Chariton river, which we found frozen over; but the ice was too weak to bear us, and the boat on the west side of the river. We went [p. 324]
Page 324