Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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in the light air. As the wind increased this tree assumed the most lively and animated appearance, and seemed to express in its motions the utmost joy and happiness. If it had been an intelligent creature, it could not have conveyed by the power of language, the idea of joy and gratitude so perfectly, as it did. And even the stream that rolled beneath it, shared apparently every sensation felt by the tree; for, as the branches danced over the stream, it would swell gently and then recede again with a motion as soft as the breathing of an infant, but as lively as the dancing of a sun beam. The belt also partook of the same influence; and, as it moved in unison with the motion of the stream, and of the tree, it increased continually continued to increase in refulgence and magnitude until it became exceedingly glorious.
I turned my eyes upon its fellow which stood <​near​> opposite; but it was not surrounded with the belt of light as the former; and it stood erect and fixed as a pillar of marble: no matter how strong the wind blew over it, not a leaf was stirred, not a bow was bent; but obstinately stiff it stood scorning alike the zephyr’s breath, or the power of the mighty storm.
I wondered at what I saw, and said in my heart, what can be the meaning of all this. And the interpretation given me was, that these personated my and his oldest brother (Jesse Smith); that the stubborn unyielding tree, was like Jesse, and the other, more pliable and flexible one, was (my husband): that the breath of heaven which passed over them, was the pure and undefiled gospel of the son of God; which gospel— Jesse would always resist; but, when should be more advanced in life, that [p. 50]
in the light air. As the wind increased this tree assumed the most lively and animated appearance, and seemed to express in its motions the utmost joy and happiness. If it had been an intelligent creature, it could not have conveyed by the power of language, the idea of joy and gratitude so perfectly, as it did. And even the stream that rolled beneath it, shared apparently every sensation felt by the tree; for, as the branches danced over the stream, it would swell gently and then recede again with a motion as soft as the breathing of an infant, but as lively as the dancing of a sun beam. The belt also partook of the same influence; and, as it moved in unison with the motion of the stream, and of the tree, it continued to increase in refulgence and magnitude until it became exceedingly glorious.
I turned my eyes upon its fellow which stood near ; but it was not surrounded with the belt of light as the former; and it stood erect and fixed as a pillar of marble: no matter how strong the wind blew over it, not a leaf was stirred, not a bow was bent; but obstinately stiff it stood scorning alike the zephyr’s breath, or the power of the mighty storm.
I wondered at what I saw, and said in my heart, what can be the meaning of all this. And the interpretation given me was, that these personated my and his oldest brother (Jesse Smith); that the stubborn unyielding tree, was like Jesse, and the other, more pliable and flexible one, was (my husband): that the breath of heaven which passed over them, was the pure and undefiled gospel of the son of God; which gospel— Jesse would always resist; but, when should be more advanced in life, that [p. 50]
Page 50