Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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attached to the written circular of the first conspiracy in , was advanced to the office of Major General, instead of being hung for treason. , one of the head leaders of the mob, was advanced to the office of Brigadier General; and Thomas Wilson, another of the mob, was elected a Captain of the Militia.
The reader will recollect that in a former part of this history, these Wilsons are represented as acting a most forward part in all the murders, house-burning, robbing and driving; and that Thomas Wilson, in particular, went so far as to fire upon certain prisoners, and to knock down one while in care of an officer, who was committing them to jail. These crimes, which in a country of laws would have hanged them or imprisoned them for life, so far exalted them in the eyes of their associates, that their worthy deeds proved a step stone to office. They all very readily received their commissions from their accomplice, ; and thus corruption, rebellion, and conspiracy had spread on every side, being fostered and encouraged by a large majority of the ; and thus the treason became general.
In the mean time our Society had greatly increased by a rapid emigration, and having long felt the withering hand of oppression from so corrupt an administration, they had endeavored to organize themselves, both civil and military, in the counties where they composed the majority, by electing such officers as they thought would stand for equal rights, and for the laws and constitution of the . And in this way they hoped to withstand the storm which had so long beat upon them, and whose black clouds now seemed lowering in awful gloom, and preparing to burst with overwhelming fury, upon all who dare to stand for liberty and law.
On the Fourth of July, 1838, many thousands of our people assembled at the city of , the [p. 26]
attached to the written circular of the first conspiracy in , was advanced to the office of Major General, instead of being hung for treason. , one of the head leaders of the mob, was advanced to the office of Brigadier General; and Thomas Wilson, another of the mob, was elected a Captain of the Militia.
The reader will recollect that in a former part of this history, these Wilsons are represented as acting a most forward part in all the murders, house-burning, robbing and driving; and that Thomas Wilson, in particular, went so far as to fire upon certain prisoners, and to knock down one while in care of an officer, who was committing them to jail. These crimes, which in a country of laws would have hanged them or imprisoned them for life, so far exalted them in the eyes of their associates, that their worthy deeds proved a step stone to office. They all very readily received their commissions from their accomplice, ; and thus corruption, rebellion, and conspiracy had spread on every side, being fostered and encouraged by a large majority of the ; and thus the treason became general.
In the mean time our Society had greatly increased by a rapid emigration, and having long felt the withering hand of oppression from so corrupt an administration, they had endeavored to organize themselves, both civil and military, in the counties where they composed the majority, by electing such officers as they thought would stand for equal rights, and for the laws and constitution of the . And in this way they hoped to withstand the storm which had so long beat upon them, and whose black clouds now seemed lowering in awful gloom, and preparing to burst with overwhelming fury, upon all who dare to stand for liberty and law.
On the Fourth of July, 1838, many thousands of our people assembled at the city of , the [p. 26]
Page 26