Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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, and all the members from , and Messrs. Rollins and Gordon, from , and by various other members from other counties, but the mob majority carried the day, for the guilty wretches feared an investigation, knowing that it would endanger their lives and liberties.
Many of the State journals have tried to hide the iniquity of the , by throwing a covering of lies over her atrocious deeds. But can they hide the ’s cruel order for extermination or banishment? Can they conceal the facts of the disgraceful treaty of the Generals, with their own officers and men, at the city of ? Can they conceal the fact that ten or eleven thousand men, women and children, have been banished from the without trial or condemnation. And this at an expense of two hundred thousand dollars, and this sum appropriated by the State Legislature, in order to pay the troops for this act of lawless outrage? Can they conceal the fact that we have been imprisoned for many months, while our families, friends and witnesses have been driven away? Can they conceal the blood of the murdered husbands, and fathers; or stifle the cries of the widow and fatherless? Nay!— The rocks and mountains may cover them in unknown depths—the awful abyss of the fathomless deep may swallow them up—and still their horrid deeds will stand forth in the broad light of day, for the wondering gaze of angels and of men! They cannot be hid.
But to return—Mr. Smith, and his fellow prisoners in , applied for a writ of habeas corpus, and were brought before the county Judges, and their cases examined as to why they were in confinement. At this trial, was let to bail under bonds of two thousand dollars, and the rest were about to be dismissed, but the mob was so violent as to threaten the lives of the Judges if they let them go. [p. 57]
, and all the members from , and Messrs. Rollins and Gordon, from , and by various other members from other counties, but the mob majority carried the day, for the guilty wretches feared an investigation, knowing that it would endanger their lives and liberties.
Many of the State journals have tried to hide the iniquity of the , by throwing a covering of lies over her atrocious deeds. But can they hide the ’s cruel order for extermination or banishment? Can they conceal the facts of the disgraceful treaty of the Generals, with their own officers and men, at the city of ? Can they conceal the fact that ten or eleven thousand men, women and children, have been banished from the without trial or condemnation. And this at an expense of two hundred thousand dollars, and this sum appropriated by the State Legislature, in order to pay the troops for this act of lawless outrage? Can they conceal the fact that we have been imprisoned for many months, while our families, friends and witnesses have been driven away? Can they conceal the blood of the murdered husbands, and fathers; or stifle the cries of the widow and fatherless? Nay!— The rocks and mountains may cover them in unknown depths—the awful abyss of the fathomless deep may swallow them up—and still their horrid deeds will stand forth in the broad light of day, for the wondering gaze of angels and of men! They cannot be hid.
But to return—Mr. Smith, and his fellow prisoners in , applied for a writ of habeas corpus, and were brought before the county Judges, and their cases examined as to why they were in confinement. At this trial, was let to bail under bonds of two thousand dollars, and the rest were about to be dismissed, but the mob was so violent as to threaten the lives of the Judges if they let them go. [p. 57]
Page 57