Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 25
image
lives of the owners have been threatened if they offered to take them, or even to go where they were. People passing civilly along the road were stopped, insulted and abused out of all bearing; and not only insulted and abused, but plundered. Families that were moving were prevented from going to their places. Bodies of armed men were passing and repassing, not only through , but the adjoining counties in open violation of the laws; committing depredations and abusing civil citizens, and that in the face of the authorities of the ; the having full knowledge of it, yet the transgressors went unpunished. And when the militia, under the before mentioned generals, went to quell them, all that was done was to make militia out of them and disband them, and send them home to enjoy the plunder which they had taken; and to gratify themselves with rehearsing to their associates acts of violence and plunder, and boasting of it, and that publicly. There was not the the first effort made to restore the property they had stolen, nor pay for the cattle they had killed, though the civil authorities were called upon time and again to do so; and at all times when called on to do so, replied, that it was in vain to undertake it, for there could not be a jury found that would do the Saints justice, and it was in vain to sue, for they would obtain nothing. Thus being put off, from time to time, the Saints had to sit down and submit to their fate.
Here probably would be as suitable a place as any to notice one circumstance, which goes far to prove the apathy which reigned in the civil authorities, and their unwillingness to do the Saints justice. The truth is, the civil officers were as much to blame for the outrages of the mob as the mob was, because they gave them lenity to do so.
There was in a quantity of arms, from forty to fifty stand. They were in the care of a man by the name of Pollard, known by the title of Capt. Pollard. While this mob was collecting in , being scarce of arms, they went to the place where those arms were deposited and took them, whether with or without the consent of Pollard we know not, and were carrying them off to . In going through from to , they had to pass through a corner of . The civil authorities of hearing of the circumstance sent the sheriff of the to intercept them in passing through the . This the sheriff effected—arrested the persons carrying the guns, and brought them to for trial. The trial came on—the facts were all proven, that the guns were taken by one of the men who was then in custody, and they were taking them to to arm the mob that was then collecting in —and it was also proven that the mob was collecting for the purpose of driving the Saints from their homes.
After the arrest and trial a letter was sent to , the circuit judge, informing him of the facts, and asking his advice, how to dispose of both the prisoners and the guns. Accordingly, when ’s army was on their march to they passed through . demanded the prisoners—they were accordingly given up. He said he had the authority of to do so. They were marched off with the troops and set at liberty, after they had been convicted at a court of inquiry, and holden to bail for their [p. 25]
lives of the owners have been threatened if they offered to take them, or even to go where they were. People passing civilly along the road were stopped, insulted and abused out of all bearing; and not only insulted and abused, but plundered. Families that were moving were prevented from going to their places. Bodies of armed men were passing and repassing, not only through , but the adjoining counties in open violation of the laws; committing depredations and abusing civil citizens, and that in the face of the authorities of the ; the having full knowledge of it, yet the transgressors went unpunished. And when the militia, under the before mentioned generals, went to quell them, all that was done was to make militia out of them and disband them, and send them home to enjoy the plunder which they had taken; and to gratify themselves with rehearsing to their associates acts of violence and plunder, and boasting of it, and that publicly. There was not the the first effort made to restore the property they had stolen, nor pay for the cattle they had killed, though the civil authorities were called upon time and again to do so; and at all times when called on to do so, replied, that it was in vain to undertake it, for there could not be a jury found that would do the Saints justice, and it was in vain to sue, for they would obtain nothing. Thus being put off, from time to time, the Saints had to sit down and submit to their fate.
Here probably would be as suitable a place as any to notice one circumstance, which goes far to prove the apathy which reigned in the civil authorities, and their unwillingness to do the Saints justice. The truth is, the civil officers were as much to blame for the outrages of the mob as the mob was, because they gave them lenity to do so.
There was in a quantity of arms, from forty to fifty stand. They were in the care of a man by the name of Pollard, known by the title of Capt. Pollard. While this mob was collecting in , being scarce of arms, they went to the place where those arms were deposited and took them, whether with or without the consent of Pollard we know not, and were carrying them off to . In going through from to , they had to pass through a corner of . The civil authorities of hearing of the circumstance sent the sheriff of the to intercept them in passing through the . This the sheriff effected—arrested the persons carrying the guns, and brought them to for trial. The trial came on—the facts were all proven, that the guns were taken by one of the men who was then in custody, and they were taking them to to arm the mob that was then collecting in —and it was also proven that the mob was collecting for the purpose of driving the Saints from their homes.
After the arrest and trial a letter was sent to , the circuit judge, informing him of the facts, and asking his advice, how to dispose of both the prisoners and the guns. Accordingly, when ’s army was on their march to they passed through . demanded the prisoners—they were accordingly given up. He said he had the authority of to do so. They were marched off with the troops and set at liberty, after they had been convicted at a court of inquiry, and holden to bail for their [p. 25]
Page 25