Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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office required no more at their hand; we have no more to say, but will let the sovereign people give their decision, and the God of Eternity dispose of them, and the matter; as seemeth wisdom and justice in his eyes.
After tampering with them as we before stated, and after having the fullest evidence that could be given; even that of their own testimony; that they were a gang of thieves and plunderers, they took , the reputed leader of the gang, and united him and his company with their troops and called the Militia, just as had done with the mob, in : and after this maneuver, disbanded them, and sent them home, as if they had been Militia regualarly called out.
It would take a volume larger than our present purpose will admit to tell all the outrages, committed by this banditti of plunderers; for it was precisely with them, as it had been with the mobs of and counties. Corn fields were laid open by them to the destruction of beasts, and carried off in wagon loads to feed their horses: cattle were killed in multitudes. There were one hundred head of cattle, belonging to the saints, which were missing, and have never been obtained until this day, nor heard of. Horses, also were taken, that belonged to them a great number of them, and have not been obtained since. Some of them have since been heard of but the lives of the owners have been threatened if they offered to take them, or even to go where they were. People passing civilly along the road, were stopped, insulted and abused, out of all bearing; and not only insulted and abused, but plundered. Families that were moving were prevented from going to their places. Bodies of armed men were passing and repassing; not only through , but the adjoining Counties in open violation of the laws; committing depredations, and abusing civil citizens, and that in the face of the authorities of the ; the having full knowledge of it, yet, the transgressors went unpunished. And when the Militia, under the before mentioned generals, went to quell them, all that was done, was to make Milita out of them, and disband them, and send them home to enjoy the plunder which they had taken; and to gratify themselves with rehearsing to their [p. 31]
office required no more at their hand; we have no more to say, but will let the sovereign people give their decision, and the God of Eternity dispose of them, and the matter; as seemeth wisdom and justice in his eyes.
After tampering with them as we before stated, and after having the fullest evidence that could be given; even that of their own testimony; that they were a gang of thieves and plunderers, they took , the reputed leader of the gang, and united him and his company with their troops and called the Militia, just as had done with the mob, in : and after this maneuver, disbanded them, and sent them home, as if they had been Militia regualarly called out.
It would take a volume larger than our present purpose will admit to tell all the outrages, committed by this banditti of plunderers; for it was precisely with them, as it had been with the mobs of and counties. Corn fields were laid open by them to the destruction of beasts, and carried off in wagon loads to feed their horses: cattle were killed in multitudes. There were one hundred head of cattle, belonging to the saints, which were missing, and have never been obtained until this day, nor heard of. Horses, also were taken, that belonged to them a great number of them, and have not been obtained since. Some of them have since been heard of but the lives of the owners have been threatened if they offered to take them, or even to go where they were. People passing civilly along the road, were stopped, insulted and abused, out of all bearing; and not only insulted and abused, but plundered. Families that were moving were prevented from going to their places. Bodies of armed men were passing and repassing; not only through , but the adjoining Counties in open violation of the laws; committing depredations, and abusing civil citizens, and that in the face of the authorities of the ; the having full knowledge of it, yet, the transgressors went unpunished. And when the Militia, under the before mentioned generals, went to quell them, all that was done, was to make Milita out of them, and disband them, and send them home to enjoy the plunder which they had taken; and to gratify themselves with rehearsing to their [p. 31]
Page 31