Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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was not there, but another man was permitted to answer for him; and after the witnesses were all sworn, and had testified, and proven the facts of the unlawfull detention, the justice pronounced no cause of action. in the mean time had gone to Carrill [Carroll] county, to join another mob which had met, to drive out a settlement of the saints that had settled in that county. The justices name was Covington. It was found that in every countty in upper , the laws would not be inforced against the mob. The civil officers would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of them would acquit the mob notwithstanding the mob would boast of thier crimes in their presence: Up till this time, there was not an officer <​a​> civil or military officer in who had been called upon to quell this gang of plunderers. That would abide by their oaths of office, from the . <​down​> When the civil officers were called upon, they would give discisions the most barefaced violations of law ever given by mortals, so much so, that <​they​> knew that they were violating thier oaths when they did <​it​>. When the military were called upon, instead of bringing the mob to justice they would call them militia, which could have been for no other purpose to but to keep them from the punishmet punishment justly due their crimes. And I am sorry to have to say it, but duty calles requires it [p. 21[a]]
was not there, but another man was permitted to answer for him; and after the witnesses were all sworn, , and proven the facts of the unlawfull detention, the justice pronounced no cause of action. in the mean time had gone to Carrill [Carroll] county, to join another mob which had met, to drive out a settlement of the saints that had settled in that county. The justices name was Covington. It was found that in every countty in upper , the laws would not be inforced against the mob. The civil officers would not regard their oaths, but in open violation of them would acquit the mob notwithstanding the mob would boast of thier crimes in their presence: Up till this time, there was not a civil or military officer in who had been called upon to quell this gang of plunderers. That would abide by their oaths of office, from the . down When the civil officers were called upon, they would give discisions the most barefaced violations of law ever given by mortals, so much so, that they knew they were violating thier oaths when they did it. When the military were called upon, instead of bringing the mob to justice they would call them militia, which could have been for no other purpose but to keep them from the punishment justly due their crimes. [p. 21[a]]
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