Times and Seasons, 1 April 1842

  • Source Note
Page 743
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
Friday, April 1, 1842.
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LADIES’ RELIEF SOCIETY.
A society has lately been formed by the ladies  of for the relief of the poor, the desti tute, the widow and the orphan; and for the ex ercise of all benevolent purposes. The society  is known by the name of the “Ladies’ Relief  Society of the City of ;” and was organ ized on Thursday the 24th of March A. D. 1842.
The society is duly organized with a Presi dentess or Chairwoman, and two Councillors,  chosen by herself; a Treasurer and Secretary.  Mrs. takes the Presidential chair,  Mrs. , and Mrs. Sarah  M. [Kingsley] Cleveland are her Councillors; Miss Elvira  Cole [Elvira Annie Cowles] is Treasuress, and our well known and  talented poetess, Miss Secretary.
There was a very numerous attendance at  the organization of the society and also at their  subsequent meetings of some of our most intel ligent, humane, philanthropic, and respectable  ladies; and we are well assured from a knowl edge of those pure principles of benevolence  that flow spontaneously from their humane, and  philanthropic bosoms, that with the resources  they will have at command they will fly to the  relief of the stranger, they will pour in oil and  wine to the wounded heart of the distressed;  they will dry up the tear of the orphan, and make  the widow’s heart to rejoice.
Our Ladies have always been signalized for  their acts of benevolence and kindness; but the  cruel usage that they have received from the  barbarians of , has hitherto prevented  their extending the hand of charity in a conspic uous manner; yet in the midst of their persecu tions, when the bread has been torn from their  helpless offsprings by their cruel oppressors,  they have always been ready to open their  doors to the weary traveller, to divide their scan ty pittance with the hungry; and from their rob bed and impoverished wardrobes, to divide with  the more needy and destitute; and now that they  are living in a more genial soil, and among a less  barbarous people, and possess facilities that  they have not heretofore enjoyed, we feel con vinced that with their concentrated efforts the  condition of the sufferring poor, of the stranger  and the fatherless will be ameliorated.
We had the privelege of being present at their  organization, and were much pleased with their  modus operandi, and the good order that prevail ed; they are strictly parliamentary in their pro ceedings; and we believe that they will make  pretty good democrats.—Ed.
 
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“TRY THE SPIRITS.”
Recent occurrences that have transpired amongst  us render it an imperative duty devolving upon  me to say something in relation to the spirits by  which men are actuated. It is evident from the  apostle’s writings that many false spirits existed  in their day, and had “gone forth into the  world,” and that it needed intelligence which  God alone could impart to detect false spirits,  and to prove what spirits were of God. The  world in general have been grossly ignorant in  regard to this one thing, and why should they  be otherwise, “For no man knows the things of  God, but by the spirit of God.” The Egyptians  were not able to discover the difference between  the miracles of Moses and those of the magi cians until they came to be tested together;  and if Moses had not appeared in their midst  they would unquestionably have thought that  the miracles of the magicians were performed  through the mighty power of God; for they  were great miracles that were performed by  them: a supernatural agency was developed; and  great power manifested.
The witch of Endor is no less singular a per sonage; clothed with a powerful agency she  raised the prophet Samuel from his grave, and  he appeared before the astonished king and re vealed unto him his future destiny. Who is to  tell whether this woman is of God, and a right eous woman? or whether the power she pos sessed was of the devil, and her a witch as repre sented by the bible? it is easy for us to say now;  but if we had lived in her day, which of us  could have unravelled the mystery?
It would have been equally as difficult for us  to tell by what spirit the prophets prophesied,  or by what power the apostles spoke, and worked  miracles. Who could have told whether the  power of Simon, the sorcerer was of God, or of  the devil? There always did in every age seem  to be a lack of intelligence pertaining to this  subject. Spirits of all kinds have been mani fested, in every age and almost amongst all peo ple: if we go among the Pagans they have  their spirits, the Mahomedans, the Jews, the  Christians, the Indians; all have their spirits,  all have a supernatural agency; and all contend  that their spirits are of God. Who shall solve  the mystery? “Try the spirits,” says John,  but who is to do it? The learned, the eloquent,  the philosopher, the sage, the divine, all are ig norant. The Heathens will boast of their Gods,  and of the great things that have been unfolded  by their oracles. The Mussulman will boast of  his Koran and of the divine communications that  his progenitors have received, and are receiving.  The Jews have had numerous instances both  ancient and modern among them of men who  have professed to be inspired and sent to bring  about great events, and the Christian world has  not been slow in making up the number.
“Try the spirits;” but what by? are we to  try them by the creeds of men? what preposter ous folly, what sheer ignorance, what madness.  Try the motions and actions of an eternal being,  (for I contend that all spirits are such,) by a  thing that was conceived in ignorance, and  brought forth in folly,—a cobweb of yesterday.  Angels would hide their faces, and devils would  be ashamed and insulted and would say, “Paul  we know, and Jesus we know, but who are ye?”  Let each man or society make a creed and try  evil spirits by it and the devil would shake his [p. 743]
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
Friday, April 1, 1842.
——————————
 
LADIES’ RELIEF SOCIETY.
A society has lately been formed by the ladies of for the relief of the poor, the destitute, the widow and the orphan; and for the exercise of all benevolent purposes. The society is known by the name of the “Ladies’ Relief Society of the City of ;” and was organized on Thursday the 24th of March A. D. 1842.
The society is duly organized with a Presidentess or Chairwoman, and two Councillors, chosen by herself; a Treasurer and Secretary. Mrs. takes the Presidential chair, Mrs. , and Mrs. Sarah M. [Kingsley] Cleveland are her Councillors; Miss Elvira Cole [Elvira Annie Cowles] is Treasuress, and our well known and talented poetess, Miss Secretary.
There was a very numerous attendance at the organization of the society and also at their subsequent meetings of some of our most intelligent, humane, philanthropic, and respectable ladies; and we are well assured from a knowledge of those pure principles of benevolence that flow spontaneously from their humane, and philanthropic bosoms, that with the resources they will have at command they will fly to the relief of the stranger, they will pour in oil and wine to the wounded heart of the distressed; they will dry up the tear of the orphan, and make the widow’s heart to rejoice.
Our Ladies have always been signalized for their acts of benevolence and kindness; but the cruel usage that they have received from the barbarians of , has hitherto prevented their extending the hand of charity in a conspicuous manner; yet in the midst of their persecutions, when the bread has been torn from their helpless offsprings by their cruel oppressors, they have always been ready to open their doors to the weary traveller, to divide their scanty pittance with the hungry; and from their robbed and impoverished wardrobes, to divide with the more needy and destitute; and now that they are living in a more genial soil, and among a less barbarous people, and possess facilities that they have not heretofore enjoyed, we feel convinced that with their concentrated efforts the condition of the sufferring poor, of the stranger and the fatherless will be ameliorated.
We had the privelege of being present at their organization, and were much pleased with their modus operandi, and the good order that prevailed; they are strictly parliamentary in their proceedings; and we believe that they will make pretty good democrats.—Ed.
 
————
“TRY THE SPIRITS.”
Recent occurrences that have transpired amongst us render it an imperative duty devolving upon me to say something in relation to the spirits by which men are actuated. It is evident from the apostle’s writings that many false spirits existed in their day, and had “gone forth into the world,” and that it needed intelligence which God alone could impart to detect false spirits, and to prove what spirits were of God. The world in general have been grossly ignorant in regard to this one thing, and why should they be otherwise, “For no man knows the things of God, but by the spirit of God.” The Egyptians were not able to discover the difference between the miracles of Moses and those of the magicians until they came to be tested together; and if Moses had not appeared in their midst they would unquestionably have thought that the miracles of the magicians were performed through the mighty power of God; for they were great miracles that were performed by them: a supernatural agency was developed; and great power manifested.
The witch of Endor is no less singular a personage; clothed with a powerful agency she raised the prophet Samuel from his grave, and he appeared before the astonished king and revealed unto him his future destiny. Who is to tell whether this woman is of God, and a righteous woman? or whether the power she possessed was of the devil, and her a witch as represented by the bible? it is easy for us to say now; but if we had lived in her day, which of us could have unravelled the mystery?
It would have been equally as difficult for us to tell by what spirit the prophets prophesied, or by what power the apostles spoke, and worked miracles. Who could have told whether the power of Simon, the sorcerer was of God, or of the devil? There always did in every age seem to be a lack of intelligence pertaining to this subject. Spirits of all kinds have been manifested, in every age and almost amongst all people: if we go among the Pagans they have their spirits, the Mahomedans, the Jews, the Christians, the Indians; all have their spirits, all have a supernatural agency; and all contend that their spirits are of God. Who shall solve the mystery? “Try the spirits,” says John, but who is to do it? The learned, the eloquent, the philosopher, the sage, the divine, all are ignorant. The Heathens will boast of their Gods, and of the great things that have been unfolded by their oracles. The Mussulman will boast of his Koran and of the divine communications that his progenitors have received, and are receiving. The Jews have had numerous instances both ancient and modern among them of men who have professed to be inspired and sent to bring about great events, and the Christian world has not been slow in making up the number.
“Try the spirits;” but what by? are we to try them by the creeds of men? what preposterous folly, what sheer ignorance, what madness. Try the motions and actions of an eternal being, (for I contend that all spirits are such,) by a thing that was conceived in ignorance, and brought forth in folly,—a cobweb of yesterday. Angels would hide their faces, and devils would be ashamed and insulted and would say, “Paul we know, and Jesus we know, but who are ye?” Let each man or society make a creed and try evil spirits by it and the devil would shake his [p. 743]
Page 743