Times and Seasons, 15 April 1842

  • Source Note
Page 761
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prison; and in order that they might fulfil all  the requisitions of God, their living friends  were baptized for their dead friends, and thus  fulfilled the requirements of God which says,  “Except a man be born again of water, and of  the spirit he can in no wise enter into the king dom of heaven;” they were baptized of course,  not for themselves, but for their dead. Crysos tum says that the Marchionites practised bap tism for the dead, “after a catachumen was dead  they hid a living man under the bed of the de ceased; then coming to the dead man they  asked him whether he would receive baptism;  and he making no answer, the other answered  for him, and said that he would be baptized in  his stead; and so they baptized the living for  the dead.”
The church of course at that time was de generate, and the particular form might be in correct, but the thing is sufficiently plain in the  scriptures, hence Paul in speaking of the doc trine says, “Else what shall they do who are  baptized for the dead? If the dead rise not at  all, why are they then baptized for the dead?”  1 Cor. xv, 29.
Hence it was that so great a responsibility  rested upon the generation in which our Savior  lived; for says he “That upon you may come  all the righteous blood shed upon the earth  from the blood of righteous Abel, unto the blood  of Zacharias, son of Barachias whom ye slew  between the temple and the altar. Verily I  say unto you all these things shall come upon  this generation.” Matt. xxiii. 35, 36. Hence  as they possessed greater privileges than any  other generation, not only pertaining to them selves but to their dead, their sin was greater;  as they not only neglected their own salvation  but that of their progenitors, and hence their  blood was required at their hands. And now  as the great purposes of God are hastening to  their accomplishment and the things spoken of  in the prophets are fulfilling, as the kingdom  of God is established on the earth, and the  ancient order of things restored, the Lord has  manifested to us this duty and privilege, and  we are commanded to be baptized for our dead  thus fulfilling the words of Obadiah when  speaking of the glory of the Latter Day. “And  saviours shall come up upon mount Zion to judge  the remnant of Esau; and the kingdom shall be  the Lords”. A view of these things reconciles the  scriptures of truth, justifies the ways of God to  man; places the human family upon an equal  footing, and harmonizes with every principle of  righteousness, justice, and truth. We will  conclude with the words of Peter: “For the  time past of our life may suffice us to have  wrought the will of the Gentiles”. . . . “For,  for this cause was the gospel preached also to  them that are dead, that they might be judged  according to men in the flesh, but live according  to God in the spirit.”—Ed.
 
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NOTICE.
On looking over our subscription list we find  many who have paid but one dollar, on the pre sent volumne, which pays for six months; and  as that time expires with this number, all who  wish the paper continued to the end of the vo lumne would do well to forward the money im mediately.
 
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CONFERENCE MINUTES.
Special Conference of the Church of Jesus  Christ of Latter-Day Saints, met according to  appointment in the City of , April 6,  1842.
The day being wet, the first Presiden cy did not attend, and Elder ad dressed those present upon the subject of  the charges against him, and said he  would be happy to have an opportunity of  laying his statement before the Confer ence, at a convenient time.
Pres’t. ,  Pres’t. pro tem., and Pres’t.  all spoke upon the subject of military af fairs, showing the necessity of a well or ganized and efficient force; that as we  were bound to serve our country if re quired in common with all good citizens,  we ought not to be behind any of our  neighbors in point of good order, neat  uniforms, and equipments, and a well or ganized, and thoroughly disciplined legion.
April 7. Conference met, Pres’t. Jo seph Smith had the several quorums put  in order, and seated: he then made some  very appropriate remarks concerning the  duties of the church, the necessity of uni ty of purpose in regard to the building of  the houses, and the blessings connected  with doing the will of God; and the incon sistency folly and danger of murmuring  against the dispensations of Jehovah.
He said that the principal object of the  meeting was to bring the case of before them, and that another object  was to choose young men, and ordain  them, and send them out to preach, that  they may have an opportunity of proving  themselves, and of enduring the tarring and  feathering and such things as those of us  who have gone before them, have had to  endure.
having arrived, was called  upon, and addressed the congregation in  relation to the nonperformance of his mis sion to : he said that when he  started with , joy filled their  hearts, and they were aware of the respon sibility of their mission. ’s  vision was that he should be in  alone, considered to be his  father and guide in the mission, and felt it  his duty to submit to ’s opinion  in all things; no elders ever were more  in concert on a mission than they were  while together; they made a cove nant in to stand by each other  while on the mission; that if they were  insulted, or imposed upon they would [p. 761]
prison; and in order that they might fulfil all the requisitions of God, their living friends were baptized for their dead friends, and thus fulfilled the requirements of God which says, “Except a man be born again of water, and of the spirit he can in no wise enter into the kingdom of heaven;” they were baptized of course, not for themselves, but for their dead. Crysostum says that the Marchionites practised baptism for the dead, “after a catachumen was dead they hid a living man under the bed of the deceased; then coming to the dead man they asked him whether he would receive baptism; and he making no answer, the other answered for him, and said that he would be baptized in his stead; and so they baptized the living for the dead.”
The church of course at that time was degenerate, and the particular form might be incorrect, but the thing is sufficiently plain in the scriptures, hence Paul in speaking of the doctrine says, “Else what shall they do who are baptized for the dead? If the dead rise not at all, why are they then baptized for the dead?” 1 Cor. xv, 29.
Hence it was that so great a responsibility rested upon the generation in which our Savior lived; for says he “That upon you may come all the righteous blood shed upon the earth from the blood of righteous Abel, unto the blood of Zacharias, son of Barachias whom ye slew between the temple and the altar. Verily I say unto you all these things shall come upon this generation.” Matt. xxiii. 35, 36. Hence as they possessed greater privileges than any other generation, not only pertaining to themselves but to their dead, their sin was greater; as they not only neglected their own salvation but that of their progenitors, and hence their blood was required at their hands. And now as the great purposes of God are hastening to their accomplishment and the things spoken of in the prophets are fulfilling, as the kingdom of God is established on the earth, and the ancient order of things restored, the Lord has manifested to us this duty and privilege, and we are commanded to be baptized for our dead thus fulfilling the words of Obadiah when speaking of the glory of the Latter Day. “And saviours shall come up upon mount Zion to judge the remnant of Esau; and the kingdom shall be the Lords”. A view of these things reconciles the scriptures of truth, justifies the ways of God to man; places the human family upon an equal footing, and harmonizes with every principle of righteousness, justice, and truth. We will conclude with the words of Peter: “For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles”. . . . “For, for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.”—Ed.
 
————
NOTICE.
On looking over our subscription list we find many who have paid but one dollar, on the present volumne, which pays for six months; and as that time expires with this number, all who wish the paper continued to the end of the volumne would do well to forward the money immediately.
 
————
CONFERENCE MINUTES.
Special Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, met according to appointment in the City of , April 6, 1842.
The day being wet, the first Presidency did not attend, and Elder addressed those present upon the subject of the charges against him, and said he would be happy to have an opportunity of laying his statement before the Conference, at a convenient time.
Pres’t. , Pres’t. pro tem., and Pres’t. all spoke upon the subject of military affairs, showing the necessity of a well organized and efficient force; that as we were bound to serve our country if required in common with all good citizens, we ought not to be behind any of our neighbors in point of good order, neat uniforms, and equipments, and a well organized, and thoroughly disciplined legion.
April 7. Conference met, Pres’t. Joseph Smith had the several quorums put in order, and seated: he then made some very appropriate remarks concerning the duties of the church, the necessity of unity of purpose in regard to the building of the houses, and the blessings connected with doing the will of God; and the inconsistency folly and danger of murmuring against the dispensations of Jehovah.
He said that the principal object of the meeting was to bring the case of before them, and that another object was to choose young men, and ordain them, and send them out to preach, that they may have an opportunity of proving themselves, and of enduring the tarring and feathering and such things as those of us who have gone before them, have had to endure.
having arrived, was called upon, and addressed the congregation in relation to the nonperformance of his mission to : he said that when he started with , joy filled their hearts, and they were aware of the responsibility of their mission. ’s vision was that he should be in alone, considered to be his father and guide in the mission, and felt it his duty to submit to ’s opinion in all things; no elders ever were more in concert on a mission than they were while together; they made a covenant in to stand by each other while on the mission; that if they were insulted, or imposed upon they would [p. 761]
Page 761