Times and Seasons, 15 March 1842

  • Source Note
Page 725
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store the label, unbind the bird, and let her tower unfettered in the air—then will the nation have repose, and the present minions of power hide their faces in the dust. Many of ’s noble sons detest her acts of cruelty and crime, and gladly would they wipe them from the escutcheon of her fame, and will; yes, they will lend a helping hand—and all must help, for the time is at hand,—and if man, rebellious, cowardly, faltering man, will not do the work, the thunderings of Sinai will wind up the scene—the blood of the murdered Mormons cries aloud for help, and the restoration of the inheritances of the saints; and God has heard the cry—and if the moral battle must be fought, and the victory won, he who answers by fire will cause sword and flame to do their office, and again make the Constitution and the Laws paramount to every other consideration—and I swear by the Lord God of Israel, that the sword shall not depart from my thigh, nor the buckler from my arm, until the trust is consummated, and the hydra-headed, fiery dragon slain. This done, the proud southron will no longer boast of ill-gotten gain, or wash his hands in the blood of the innocent, or immure the freemen of the within ’s sullied, poisoned, deathly prison walls. Let us always take refuge under the broad folds of the Constitution and the Laws, and fear no danger, for the day of vengence will assuredly come when the Omnipotent hand of the Great God will effect the restitution of the trophies of the brigand victories of , and again place the saints on high.
Yours, Respectfully,
.
General Joseph Smith.
 
————
THE JEWS.
The following will show what the feelings of the Jews are, in regard to moral rectitude, and that although persecuted, afflicted, robbed and spoiled, they still adhere with great tenacity to their ancient moral code, and maintain principles of benevolence and charity which many of our professedly enlightened christians would do well to imitate.—Ed.
Rabbi Hersch’s Essays on Israel’s duties in Dispersion. The Head Rabbi of the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg.
“Commandments. The commandment of God is duty for Israel, the will of God the only ground of obligation for all our duties; can there be any other ground for obligation for any duty, which any one is bound to perform? Is it possible to imagine that any thing should be a duty, without thinking it to be at the same time the will of God? Duty signifies rule of action; but every thing necessary for action; we ourselves, with all our faculties and powers, and the world that surrounds us belong to God:—who has then to dispose of us but God? If this be true for all men, how much more for Israel, who have a double bond of union with the Creator; who not only made them as men, but has also fixed the bounds of their habitation among men. The command of God is therefore duty, and the will of God the obligation to duty. . . . . If, therefore, each command of God was an enigma; and if a thousand unanswered and unanswerable questions obtruded themselves on us, concerning each, still the obligation to obedience would be in no degree lessened. If any one ask why should I do this, why avoid that? we have only one answer to give—because it is the will of God; and we are to serve God with every capability, every faculty, every breath. . . . . We should be bound to obey, not on this account, or the other, but because God requires it, if we do it not for this reason, how can we be the servants of God? how can we be said to obey God? The Jew who faithfully observes and keeps the law of God, as he gave them to the congregation of Jacob, is, in the full and unlimited sense of the word, a Jew—as he does this in order to fulfil the will of God—he is a servant of God, although he may never have understood the connexion, or import of even one of all the divine commands, and has obtained great, yea, the greatest happiness on earth: for the pure in heart know no higher bliss than the fulfilling the divine will.
He makes the following remarks on alms giving, founded on Deut. vii: 2.—Thou shalt open thine hand wide to thy brother, to thy poor. With these words God calls thee to thy most lovely, thy most holy employment; to that in which thou art most like himself: he calls thee to be a blessing, with all that he has given thee, to be a blessing to all about thee. Look around in the great household of thy Father, every thing is appointed to thy blessing. Every thing helps, and is helped; every thing takes and gives, and receives [p. 725]
store the label, unbind the bird, and let her tower unfettered in the air—then will the nation have repose, and the present minions of power hide their faces in the dust. Many of ’s noble sons detest her acts of cruelty and crime, and gladly would they wipe them from the escutcheon of her fame, and will; yes, they will lend a helping hand—and all must help, for the time is at hand,—and if man, rebellious, cowardly, faltering man, will not do the work, the thunderings of Sinai will wind up the scene—the blood of the murdered Mormons cries aloud for help, and the restoration of the inheritances of the saints; and God has heard the cry—and if the moral battle must be fought, and the victory won, he who answers by fire will cause sword and flame to do their office, and again make the Constitution and the Laws paramount to every other consideration—and I swear by the Lord God of Israel, that the sword shall not depart from my thigh, nor the buckler from my arm, until the trust is consummated, and the hydra-headed, fiery dragon slain. This done, the proud southron will no longer boast of ill-gotten gain, or wash his hands in the blood of the innocent, or immure the freemen of the within ’s sullied, poisoned, deathly prison walls. Let us always take refuge under the broad folds of the Constitution and the Laws, and fear no danger, for the day of vengence will assuredly come when the Omnipotent hand of the Great God will effect the restitution of the trophies of the brigand victories of , and again place the saints on high.
Yours, Respectfully,
.
General Joseph Smith.
 
————
THE JEWS.
The following will show what the feelings of the Jews are, in regard to moral rectitude, and that although persecuted, afflicted, robbed and spoiled, they still adhere with great tenacity to their ancient moral code, and maintain principles of benevolence and charity which many of our professedly enlightened christians would do well to imitate.—Ed.
Rabbi Hersch’s Essays on Israel’s duties in Dispersion. The Head Rabbi of the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg.
“Commandments. The commandment of God is duty for Israel, the will of God the only ground of obligation for all our duties; can there be any other ground for obligation for any duty, which any one is bound to perform? Is it possible to imagine that any thing should be a duty, without thinking it to be at the same time the will of God? Duty signifies rule of action; but every thing necessary for action; we ourselves, with all our faculties and powers, and the world that surrounds us belong to God:—who has then to dispose of us but God? If this be true for all men, how much more for Israel, who have a double bond of union with the Creator; who not only made them as men, but has also fixed the bounds of their habitation among men. The command of God is therefore duty, and the will of God the obligation to duty. . . . . If, therefore, each command of God was an enigma; and if a thousand unanswered and unanswerable questions obtruded themselves on us, concerning each, still the obligation to obedience would be in no degree lessened. If any one ask why should I do this, why avoid that? we have only one answer to give—because it is the will of God; and we are to serve God with every capability, every faculty, every breath. . . . . We should be bound to obey, not on this account, or the other, but because God requires it, if we do it not for this reason, how can we be the servants of God? how can we be said to obey God? The Jew who faithfully observes and keeps the law of God, as he gave them to the congregation of Jacob, is, in the full and unlimited sense of the word, a Jew—as he does this in order to fulfil the will of God—he is a servant of God, although he may never have understood the connexion, or import of even one of all the divine commands, and has obtained great, yea, the greatest happiness on earth: for the pure in heart know no higher bliss than the fulfilling the divine will.
He makes the following remarks on alms giving, founded on Deut. vii: 2.—Thou shalt open thine hand wide to thy brother, to thy poor. With these words God calls thee to thy most lovely, thy most holy employment; to that in which thou art most like himself: he calls thee to be a blessing, with all that he has given thee, to be a blessing to all about thee. Look around in the great household of thy Father, every thing is appointed to thy blessing. Every thing helps, and is helped; every thing takes and gives, and receives [p. 725]
Page 725