Times and Seasons, 15 October 1842

  • Source Note
Page 947
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a number of persons. The former was the Asiatic cholera; but the present is only considered by medical men as a violent attack of diarrhoea and dysentery, which, however, if not taken in time, is equally fatal to the unfortunate patient. For the last fifty years fruit has not been remembered to be so plentiful as during the present season, which supply has been so much increased by the immense quantity imported from , Covent Garden, Hungerford, the Borough, Spitalfields, and other markets, in the metropolis, have had such abundant supplies that it was with difficulty the dealers could dispose of them at any price. The present malady, which is now so extensively raging, is mostly attributed by the faculty to an over-indulgence in fruit, and not from any epidemic, so as to cause any alarm to the public; as those who have unfortunately fallen victims to its dreadful effects have been ascertained to have made a very free use of fruit, which, added to a disordered state of the system, caused by the excessive heat that has prevailed for the last month would alone bring on a violent attuck of cholera, or, more properly speaking, diarrhoea. The number of deaths since July 16th to 20th instant, has been upwards of 200, some of them decided cases, among which may be mentioned that of the late Mr. Barrett, the Governor of Whitecross street prison. It has, however, been more confined to children and aged persons. In the number of deaths has been very great, attributed entirely to the same causes, but not from epidemic—Morning paper.
The mortality from cholera, diarrhoea, and dysentery in , for the three weeks ending August 6, amounted to 109 deaths; for the previous three weeks, ending July 16, 40; making an increase of 69 deaths in the course of the last three weeks—a consequence of the rash indulgence resulting from the plenty and cheapness of fruit. Children and aged persons have been the greatest sufferers.
 
————
Butchery in China.—We find the following paragraph in the London Sun of the 3d instant, relative to the last battle in China:—
Arrangements were made for an attack in three columns, two of which were gallantly led by Sir H. Gough and Sir W. Parker in person. Nothing could exceed the bravery of the troops. They contrived to surround the Chinese, and quite bewildered them. The carnage was dreadful, being more a butchery than a battle. Ignorant of the laws of civilized warfare, the poor creatures knew not how to surrender, and were massacred. Not less than a thousand of them, including a great number of Mandarins, were killed, or drowned in the canals; whereas of the British troops only three were killed and twenty-two wounded. The encampments, and such of the buildings as had been occupied by the enemy, were burned, and the grain magazines thrown open to the populace, who speedily emptied them.
According to this, the English forces were gallantly led on to one of the most horrible butcheries on record!
 
————
Disturbances in the Provinces.—A Special Commission is on the eve of being issued for the trial of the rioters apprehended during the late disturbances in the manufacturing districts. Nothing is wanting but the nomination of the learned Judges to undertake this arduous duty, and it is expected that this will be arranged forthwith. The last occasion of a commisssion being issued was for the trial of Frost and his companions, in the winter of 1840. Lord Chief Justice Tindal, Mr. Justice Williams, and Mr. Sergeant Ludlow were the Judges then selected. The character of the recent outbreak being of so much more general a nature, there is every reason to believe that a greater number will be appointed.
In our last it was our painful duty to record a series of the most violent popular movements in the manufacturing districts, and it is with some degree of pleasure that we have now to state that violence has almost subsided, and though in many of the manufacturing towns the workmen still remain out, yet, it is gratifying to know that the quarrel now is one only between masters and men; not partaking in the least degree of a national character. The cry of the mob now is “more wages, and not the Charter or no work.” A number of the poor deluded men who took a leading part in the recent disturbances have been apprehended, and it is expected that a special commission will be shortly granted for their trial.— It is expected that in a few days all the hands now out will return to their employment. [p. 947]
a number of persons. The former was the Asiatic cholera; but the present is only considered by medical men as a violent attack of diarrhoea and dysentery, which, however, if not taken in time, is equally fatal to the unfortunate patient. For the last fifty years fruit has not been remembered to be so plentiful as during the present season, which supply has been so much increased by the immense quantity imported from , Covent Garden, Hungerford, the Borough, Spitalfields, and other markets, in the metropolis, have had such abundant supplies that it was with difficulty the dealers could dispose of them at any price. The present malady, which is now so extensively raging, is mostly attributed by the faculty to an over-indulgence in fruit, and not from any epidemic, so as to cause any alarm to the public; as those who have unfortunately fallen victims to its dreadful effects have been ascertained to have made a very free use of fruit, which, added to a disordered state of the system, caused by the excessive heat that has prevailed for the last month would alone bring on a violent attuck of cholera, or, more properly speaking, diarrhoea. The number of deaths since July 16th to 20th instant, has been upwards of 200, some of them decided cases, among which may be mentioned that of the late Mr. Barrett, the Governor of Whitecross street prison. It has, however, been more confined to children and aged persons. In the number of deaths has been very great, attributed entirely to the same causes, but not from epidemic—Morning paper.
The mortality from cholera, diarrhoea, and dysentery in , for the three weeks ending August 6, amounted to 109 deaths; for the previous three weeks, ending July 16, 40; making an increase of 69 deaths in the course of the last three weeks—a consequence of the rash indulgence resulting from the plenty and cheapness of fruit. Children and aged persons have been the greatest sufferers.
 
————
Butchery in China.—We find the following paragraph in the London Sun of the 3d instant, relative to the last battle in China:—
Arrangements were made for an attack in three columns, two of which were gallantly led by Sir H. Gough and Sir W. Parker in person. Nothing could exceed the bravery of the troops. They contrived to surround the Chinese, and quite bewildered them. The carnage was dreadful, being more a butchery than a battle. Ignorant of the laws of civilized warfare, the poor creatures knew not how to surrender, and were massacred. Not less than a thousand of them, including a great number of Mandarins, were killed, or drowned in the canals; whereas of the British troops only three were killed and twenty-two wounded. The encampments, and such of the buildings as had been occupied by the enemy, were burned, and the grain magazines thrown open to the populace, who speedily emptied them.
According to this, the English forces were gallantly led on to one of the most horrible butcheries on record!
 
————
Disturbances in the Provinces.—A Special Commission is on the eve of being issued for the trial of the rioters apprehended during the late disturbances in the manufacturing districts. Nothing is wanting but the nomination of the learned Judges to undertake this arduous duty, and it is expected that this will be arranged forthwith. The last occasion of a commisssion being issued was for the trial of Frost and his companions, in the winter of 1840. Lord Chief Justice Tindal, Mr. Justice Williams, and Mr. Sergeant Ludlow were the Judges then selected. The character of the recent outbreak being of so much more general a nature, there is every reason to believe that a greater number will be appointed.
In our last it was our painful duty to record a series of the most violent popular movements in the manufacturing districts, and it is with some degree of pleasure that we have now to state that violence has almost subsided, and though in many of the manufacturing towns the workmen still remain out, yet, it is gratifying to know that the quarrel now is one only between masters and men; not partaking in the least degree of a national character. The cry of the mob now is “more wages, and not the Charter or no work.” A number of the poor deluded men who took a leading part in the recent disturbances have been apprehended, and it is expected that a special commission will be shortly granted for their trial.— It is expected that in a few days all the hands now out will return to their employment. [p. 947]
Page 947